chemical mediator

chemical mediator

A nonspecific term for a chemical agent which carries out a process or reaction.

Chemical mediator is often used interchangeably with neurotransmitter—when possible, the latter term should be used as it confers specificity.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is claimed to inhibit the synthesis of TGF-beta, a chemical mediator that controls many cell functions including proliferation and differentiation, and plays a major role in fibrosis.
A new study demonstrates that a chemical mediator in the blood that influences immune cell migration also plays a key role in maintaining the balance between the build-up and breakdown of bones in the body.
Localized mast cells in affected tissues produce histamine, a chemical mediator that dilates blood vessels at the site of injury, producing redness and heat.
This and other chemical mediators react with tissues, resulting in allergic symptoms, depending on the tissue in which the chemical mediator is released.[6] For example, chemical mediators expelled in the nose, results in rhinitis; in the lungs, asthma.
For years, antihistamines--so called because they work to block the release of the chemical mediator histamine, thought to be a primary mediator in sinus allergies--and decongestants were considered to be first-line treatment.
The exact effects of each chemical mediator have yet to be determined.
Lin CN, Lee TH, Hsu MF, Wang JP, Ko FN, Teng CM (1997) 2', 5'- Dihydroxychalcone as a potent chemical mediator and cyclooxygenase inhibitor.
Pharmaceutical chemists provide a broad survey of the current status of techniques in drug delivery, pharmacological aspects of natural products, chemical mediators: druggable targets, and developments in medicinal chemistry.
Pain is experienced when nociceptors (pain receptors) in the tissues are activated by chemical mediators released from damaged or stressed cells.
After contact with an allergen, mast cells and basophiles release chemical mediators. Increased immunoglobulin E (IgE) is responsible for pathogenesis.