chemical equation


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chem·i·cal e·qua·tion

an equation on one side of which are the reactants and on the other side of which are the products of a chemical reaction; the two halves may be separated by an equals sign or by arrows.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Introduce concept of displacement reaction illustrating with full balanced chemical equation for the reaction between zinc and aqueous copper(II) sulfate.
He noted that rising levels in the oceans were not just a political issue; it was also more than balancing a chemical equation. Climate change is a war zone for Pacific Island Nations, he observed.
The doctor did not create a formula or invent a chemical equation. Instead, he resorted to nature.
The key metals in the battery are common vanadium and magnesium, the professor explained as he chalked a basic chemical equation on the board.
Students should be led to understand that a chemical equation represents the outcome of a sequence of two-particle collisions.
As 6-year-old Brooke Wagner and father David Wagner wandered into the conference room at the Science Factory, Randy Sullivan, a chemistry instructor at the University of Oregon, was discussing the merits of a chemical equation with a few others.
It really bugs me when I see people substituting equal signs, double-headed arrows or anything else they can think up to indicate our beloved double-harpoon arrows in a chemical equation. The chemical profession seems to operate so quietly that they disappear into the background.
They are as much about learning new skills and taking those first steps into adulthood as they are about memorising dates of battles and chemical equations.
The Pomodoro Technique really came in handy back in school when the last thing I wanted to do was practice balancing chemical equations or solve math problems.
I wasn't going to come up to a friend in the near future and say, 'Hey, want some balanced chemical equations?'
On the other hand, think of the percentage of time students spend being taught and trying to learn (if only until after the exam) material they'll never use: the intricacies of Shakespeare, geometric proofs, balancing chemical equations, the causes of the Peloponnesian Wars, years of Spanish (yet ending up unable to speak more than restaurant Spanish.) And the cost - not just the hundreds of thousands of dollars for college and hundreds of thousands more for graduate school but the opportunity cost: what you could have been earning and learning of real-world value if you weren't stuck behind a desk listening to Professor Hasenpfeffer.
"These back-woodsmen didn't rely on chemical equations. Here, intuition played the main role and each stiller had his own unique method."

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