chemical carcinogen


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chemical carcinogen

Any chemical substance capable of causing cancer.
See also: carcinogen
References in periodicals archive ?
The identified proteins were associated with HaCaT DNBS damage, which also implicates they might be potential targets for skin cell damage and skin diseases caused by chemical carcinogens. To validate the protein identification results by proteomic approach, the densitometric quantification results for expression levels detected by Western blotting (WB) for PTGES3, CALM3, TCEB2, IL18, BANF1, MYL6 and RPL23 are shown in Fig.3.
A growing body of toxicological research suggests that most chemical carcinogens cause their damage by binding to DNA, forming adducts.
Mammary tumors formed in various strains of rats induced by chemical carcinogens or radiation have been classified by several authors (9,14,29).
Tobacco products act as chemical carcinogens and participate in chemical carcinogenesis.
Mutagenicity of chemical carcinogens: correlations, problems, and interpretations.
The Health and Safety Executive's Disease Reduction Programme (DRP) Cancer Project was set in motion during 2004 to build on the existing partnerships with UK industry employers, employees and trades unions to reduce the risk of exposure to chemical carcinogens in the workplace.
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has organised a two-day conference at which technical experts, academics, union representatives and others are seeking ways to cut exposure to chemical carcinogens.
In her latest studies, Rimando and scientists at the University of Medical Science in Poznan, Poland, led by Renata Mikstacka, showed pterostilbene's potential as a cancer-inhibiting compound with regard to inhibiting enzymes that activate chemical carcinogens. Using mice cells, they demonstrated that pterostilbene, as well as other analogs of resveratrol, potently inhibits an enzyme called "cytochrome P450."
And the people won't have a voice." Not even over safety issues such as working with chemical carcinogens. Says Craig: "You'll handle them, or you'll go home."
Among their topics are developing an association between food and cancer, the metabolism of chemical carcinogens, the impact of dietary anti-oxidants and pro-oxidants on oxidative DNA damage and cancer risk, cancer prevention by tea and tea constituents, carotenoids in cancer prevention, and phytoestrogens.
He notes that the World Health Organization and the Institute of Medicine in Washington, D.C., accept such case studies "as evidence in making causal inferences," especially about reactions to drugs, poisons, and chemical carcinogens.