chelate


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Related to chelate: EDTA, Chelate Effect

chelate

 [ke´lāt]
1. to combine with a metal in complexes in which the metal is part of a ring.
2. by extension, a chemical compound in which a metallic ion is sequestered and firmly bound into a ring within the chelating molecule. Chelates are used in chemotherapy of metal poisoning.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

che·late

(kē'lāt),
1. To effect chelation.
2. Pertaining to chelation.
3. A complex formed through chelation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chelate

(kē′lāt′)
adj. Zoology
Having chelae or resembling a chela.
n. Chemistry
A chemical compound in the form of a heterocyclic ring, containing a metal ion attached by coordinate bonds to at least two nonmetal ions.
tr.v. che·lated, che·lating, che·lates
1. Chemistry To combine (a metal ion) with a chemical compound to form a ring.
2. Medicine To remove (a heavy metal, such as lead or mercury) from the bloodstream by means of a chelate, such as EDTA.

che′lat·a·ble adj.
che·la′tion n.
che′la′tor n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

che·late

(kē'lāt)
1. To effect chelation.
2. Pertaining to chelation.
3. A complex formed through chelation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

chelate

  1. possessing claws or pincer-like appendages.
  2. to combine with a metal ion to form a stable compound.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Chelate

A chemical that binds to heavy metals in the blood, thereby helping the body to excrete them in urine.
Mentioned in: Nephrotoxic Injury
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The experiment was conducted to examine the productivity of broiler meat according to the level and period of iron-methionine chelate supplementation, to find out the extent of Fe accumulation within broiler meat and ultimately to develop effective means of producing iron-enriched broiler meat.
Activity of this enzyme (iron chelate reductase) is a measure of the intensity of a plant's reaction to iron stress.
Table-3: Mass spectral fragmentation of Schiff base anthranilic acid and their Ni(II) mixed ligand chelate.
However, there is no available information on the effect of Fe-methionine chelate on the growth performance of broilers when supplemented at pharmacological level.
Current practice and potential advantages of fluorescent [Eu.sup.3+] chelates as non-radioisotopic tracers [Review].
Less irritation has been indicated in human studies from ingesting these minerals as metal amino acid chelates.
The effectiveness of foliar applications of synthesized zinc-amino acid chelates in comparison with zinc sulfate to increase yield and grain nutritional quality of wheat.
Therefore, research was continued with preparation of metal chelates before transferring to column and certain limited volume of chelate solution would be percolated through the column containing pure resin under the optimized conditions.
(v) EDTA-copper chelate: for EDTA chelated copper solution, 1 gr of CuS[O.sub.4] x 5[H.sub.2]O and 1 gr of EDTA were mixed in 100 mL of deionized water.
It can be seen from Figure 3 that, in both gas and aqueous phases, the lengths of the M-[O.sub.1] bonds are longer than those of the M-[O.sub.2] bonds in juglone chelates. It is clearly evidenced from the figure that, apart from the Cu(II) chelate, the solvent environment increases the two M-O bond lengths, which is apparently responsible for the interaction energy increment ongoing from the gas to the solvent phase.
In the copper chelation assay, the uses of different concentrations (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7mg/ml) of the same extracts or (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 70 [micro]g/ml) of the EDTA showed a significant (p [less than or equal to] 0.01) dose dependent ability to chelate copper ions with 0,43 [+ or -] 0,03 at 7mg/ml compared to the control and the rest extracts (CLE, EALE and MLE) which presented a high stable absorbance, but this capacity still low compared to the standard chelator which gave a very significant (p [less than or equal to] 0.001) capacity with 0,13 [+ or -] 0,005 at only 70 [micro]g/ml.
Moreover also recent in vitro data evidence that NAC may chelate and form conjugates with cobalt [21].