Cheating

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Related to cheat: Cheat codes
Sports medicine Slang for the use of ancillary muscles to achieve a particular movement—e.g., bench presses—because the muscle group normally used for the movement has been overloaded
Vox populi The use of subterfuge, deceit or fraud in one’s interpersonal or business interactions
References in periodicals archive ?
The outcomes of these faculty-driven cheating inquiries were not generally reported to anyone; thus, it was possible for students to cheat multiple times without any accountability at the university level.
If you are supposed to memorise the whole book for one exam, then you will definitely cheat if you are the type who cannot memorise much.
Previous research has found students who cheat more believe consequences should be less severe (Kufahl, Shoptaugh, Miller, & Levesque, 2005) and demonstrate lower levels of Academic Integrity Responsibility (Miller, Shoptaugh, & Wooldrige, 2011).
Is punishment motivated purely by a desire for revenge, or do individuals judge whether cheats end up better off than them before deciding whether to punish?
Therefore, understanding competitive incentives to cheat is relevant to enforcement in all these areas.
Berentsen (2002) considers a game with two heterogeneous players who simultaneously decide whether or not to cheat (take performance-enhancing drugs) before competing.
Discusses the growing problem of students using cell phones and PDAs in order to cheat in class.
Which 2008 film saw Kevin Spacey teaching students how to cheat at blackjack?
Two studies of more than 400 students at Ohio State University in America found those who did not cheat scored highest in tests of courage and empathy.
A young high- schooler recorded herself putting cheat sheets into the clear casing of a pen -- a method she said got her through a difficult test.
A DALLAS MORNING NEWS investigation has concluded that tens of thousands of students cheat on the high-stakes assessment test that Texas students take each year.
A person commits an offence if he a) cheats at gambling, or b) does anything for the purpose of enabling or assisting another person to cheat at gambling.