charlatanry


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to charlatanry: charlatanism, Charlitain

charlatanry

(1) Charlatanism, see there.
(2) Quackery, see there.

charlatanry

(shăr′lă-tăn-rē)
Undue pretension to knowledge or skill that is not possessed.
References in periodicals archive ?
25) They are amazingly well done, considering that translation can expose charlatanry quicker than any sleuth.
Wilson's account fails to describe the enormous budget of deception, charlatanry, careerism, ill will, and ignorance that underlies so much of the politics in question.
He describes the various "ritual specialists" who perform these rites, most of them doubtless with sincere intent, but sometimes descending into charlatanry, like the she-pa, ritual extractors of "foreign objects" said to be lodged in the body of a sick person (pp.
This leads him into some splendid attacks on charlatanry masquerading as truth.
In the 1830s and '40s, however, visitors to the same region confronted a hotbed of social experimentation--religious enthusiasm, social reform, utopianism, and charlatanry of every description.
Acknowledging the deliberate amphiboly of Heidegger's usage of the word, Young suggests: "In an imperfect world, it is hot uncommon to find genius go hand in hand with a touch of charlatanry (or, more charitably, showmanship)" (p.
For instance, William Frederick Pinchback delighted in exposing the charlatanry of seances and the oracles of the day.
Stephens and Winkler 1995, 365, on the Iolaos and Tinouphis fragments: 'Both focus on areas in which religion could and often did cross over into charlatanry, both mix in sex and low life in metrical form, both are written in a vigorous but hardly elegant Greek, both are full of textual errors, neither shows a trace of serious purpose.
Any attempt to eliminate charlatanry would have been out the question, given its close links with mainstream physic and its popularity.
Lloyd Webber's recent disaster, Whistle Down the Wind, was adapted from a film that had tiptoed along a frail line between bathetic charlatanry and genuine emotion.
Thus, the failure, or antithesis, of this understanding of history is not fiction, not mythos, but charlatanry, fraud, the sin of author/source not "really" being there at the events in question.