charlatanry


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Related to charlatanry: charlatanism, Charlitain

charlatanry

(1) Charlatanism, see there.
(2) Quackery, see there.

charlatanry

(shăr′lă-tăn-rē)
Undue pretension to knowledge or skill that is not possessed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Psychotherapy's progress did not come without much confusion and excess, and even cruelty--lobotomies, excessive use of electroshock therapy, and charlatanry. A 1970s study by the California State Psychological Association found that more than five percent of male psychologists had had sex with female patients, some claiming that intercourse was a bona fide therapeutic technique.
of Quebec, Canada) provides an introduction to critical thinking necessary for avoiding charlatanry and for being a good citizen.
More so than Shakespeare, and closely following the Venetian travel accounts of Thomas Coryate and others, Jonson understands the structural connections between the new year-round professional theatre and mercenary charlatanry that have recently been explored by scholars such as Roberto Tessari and Kenneth and Laura Richards.
Laing's "diagnosis" was classic psychiatric gobbledygook, precisely the kind of charlatanry he pretended to oppose.
This represents from his perspective the triumph of artistic taste over intellectual charlatanry. In painters such as Thomas Hope, Eugene Delacroix, Alexandre Gabriel Decamps, and John Frederick Lewis; in painters who wrote about the Orient including Leon Belly, Alfred Dhodencq, and Gustave Guillaumet; in Charles Cordier's sculpture; in Mozart's The Abduction from the Seraglio and The Magic Flute; and even in the writings of Rudyard Kipling, Ibn Warraq finds a powerful determination to convey the color, texture, and, most of all, the humanity of the men and women of the East.
Official documents indicate that larger festivals continued to involve such undesirable activities as 'superstitious practices', gambling, drunkenness and charlatanry; restricting the organisation of these events was thus a way to limit these practices.
Lourdes was a boon to the mass press, France's new "ultimate public arbiter of truth," which trained accusations of fraud and charlatanry on the one side against charges of impiety and shabby atheism on the other to sell a sensationalized product to a nation keenly interested in the competition of absolute truth claims at the fin-de-siecle (p.
(32) It is questionable, however, whether the incompetence of antitrust juries and the charlatanry of some economic experts has as profound an influence as other adjudicatory design features do in antitrust cases.
First, allowing health claims based only on traditional use is an invitation for charlatanry. Consumers rely on health claims when purchasing NHPs, and leaving them unregulated will result in economic exploitation.
It played a big part in exposing intellectual and academic corruption in general--for example the charlatanry and incompetence of the Australian Left's hero-historian, the Lenin Jubilee Medalist Manning Clark.
(88.) "The Boston Religious Press, " The Journalist, 9 July 1887; "The Decadence of the Religious Press, " ibid., 9 June 1888; "Charlatanry and the Religious Press, " ibid., 16 June 1888; Marie Flaacke, "Religious Papers, " ibid., 23 June 1888.
"What I would rather not do, frankly, is go into a lot of charlatanry about that.