characterize

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characterize

(kăr′ăk-tĕr-īz″)
To mark, identify, or describe the attributes of something. This helps to distinguish an individual or material from other examples of similar individuals or materials.
References in periodicals archive ?
I said that the characterizability of a sex-dependent restriction in neutral terms does not settle the question whether the restriction is objectionable, because (by definition of a sex-dependent restriction) it will necessarily also remain characterizable as being predicated on consideration of sex.
These are transitions characterizable, on the whole, in terms of "ambiguously lateral moves," "retrospective losses," and "unpredictable wage outcomes." (4) Unlike the old career ladder, it is entirely possible to be moving sideways when one actually thinks one is moving up.
Even after reading it several times, I could not see exactly how it's supposed to fit into Tales or what Pigliucci is trying to say At times he seems to suggest that a scientific theory ought to be characterizable by a straw man (p.
[w]hat is appropriately characterizable as "arbitrary
One set of features that is conductive to the perception of a sport as masculine is characterizable by the required behavior of the sport participant according to the rules of the game.
(26) I have emphasized that Sextus could characterize his concepts in terms of his own appearances because they are the only ones that are strictly speaking available for the purpose; what is crucial for my argument, however, is only that they be characterizable in terms of appearances in general, since Sextus says nothing to suggest that such concepts, or propositions couched in terms of them, might be incoherent.
If, for example, someone chooses not to intervene to protect someone's dignity or well-being for the sake of economic gain, such silence and inaction are themselves characterizable as conduct that is not economic personalist.
The social structure of society is not characterizable as something standing alone, apart from the activity and people that created it.
Mulvihill's paper points out that any language is taken to be characterizable through form and content, and creativity occurs where form and content mix.
This does not mean that he takes the characters to be real people with their own agency, their own unconscious, merely that he sees them as more characterizable, because more language is attributed to them, than the person he scrupulously refers to as "the author of Shakespeare's plays." It is their language that works against them--or, sometimes, not their own language but the language of the play, or of other plays.
Certainly, understanding human language is not characterizable in terms of `mere' sensory perception; but if we `perceive' human discourse in some sense, then how can we deny that we `perceive' the performance of the actors and the speeches of the characters in a performance of Hamlet?
Johnston rejects both eliminativism and the assumption that a credible distinction between an F (an object of a certain sort) and its F-configured constituting matter "has to be substantial and characterizable independently of our practice of making judgments which exhibit certain patterns and demarcations." We are assured that:

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