chaparral


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chaparral

Alternative oncology
A drought-adapted evergreen, the major component of which is nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), which may be used to treat GI tumours, leukaemia and brain gliomas.

Herbal medicine
Chaparral was once used by Native American herbalists as an antiarthritic and antitussive (effects that have not been confirmed by modern herbalists), for diarrhoea and other GI complaints, and topically for wounds.
 
Toxicity
Chaparral causes cramping, nausea and vomiting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chaparral Energy (NYSE: CHAP) is an independent oil and natural gas exploration and production company headquartered in Oklahoma City.
With these and other acquisitions completed by Summit Companies since coming under the ownership of CI Capital Partners, the acquisition of Chaparral Fire Protection in Utah increases Summit's geographic density in the Western US.
Chaparral's common stock began trading on the New York Stock Exchange in July using the ticker symbol CHAP.
The College of DuPage Chaparrals successfully defended their title, besting Minnesotas Mesabi Range Community College Norsemen 35-0 in the 2017 National Junior College Athletic Association Red Grange Bowl.
Chaparral is also one of California's most biodiverse ecosystem types, which sets another imperative for land managers: avoiding the degradation or loss of chaparral systems.
Chaparral uses Journyx as a database for time tracking, equipment utilization reporting and DOT reporting.
Chaparral wildfires in southern California, especially those driven by hot, dry Santa Ana winds in the fall, spread quickly, burn at high intensities, and have the potential to reach thousands of hectares in size.
Mick Kinane and Darryll Holland, riders of High Chaparral and Falbrav, soon had their mounts perfectly positioned in third and fourth, stalking 40-1 outsider Balto Star.
Despite the move, Chaparral says there is no guarantee that the company will pursue any of the transactions that could result.
"Chaparral needs some kind of ambassador," says Richard Halsey, a teacher-turned-biologist who, as founder of the California Chaparral Field Institute, is trying to be just that.
Writing for longtime residents and new arrivals, Halsey, a biologist and fire ecologist who teaches at the San Diego Natural History Museum, explains why everyone who lives in California's fire country should understand the chaparral, the state's most extensive plant community, and learn how to prepare for wildfires and what to expect when the flames approach.