chameleon

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Related to chamaeleon: Chamaeleo chamaeleon

chameleon

(kă-mēl'yon),
A fluorescent indicator engineered to bind to specified intracellular locations for investigation of biologic reactions (for example, calcium-mediated signals).
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References in periodicals archive ?
but there happens to be this merry coincidence between my name and that of an inconspicuous constellation in the southern sky: chamaeleon! and it could just as well have been named after me, because there are many similarities between us.
Chamaeleon's brightest stars are only 4th magnitude, but the constellation contains two remarkable deep-sky objects.
in Chamaeleon IC 2602 open cluster in Carina NGC 3372 bright nebula in Carina Messier 83 galaxy in Hydra Planets
THE TINY CONSTELLATION of Chamaeleon lies in the far-southern sky between Musca, the Fly, and the south celestial pole.
The 0.3-light-year-long "tornado," an object in Chamaeleon known as Herbig-Haro 49/50, is not actually spinning.
Deep-sky objects Designation Object type and constellation NGC 2516 open cluster in Carina Messier 48 open cluster in Hydra IC 2391 open cluster in Vela NGC 2808 globular cluster in Carina NGC 2867 planetary nebula in Carina IC 2488 open cluster in Vela NGC 3115 galaxy in Sextans NGC 3132 planetary nebula in Vela NGC 3195 planetary nebula in Chamaeleon NGC 3201 globular cluster in Vela NGC 3242 planetary nebula in Hydra NGC 3293 open cluster in Carina IC 2602 open cluster in Carina NGC 3372 bright nebula in Carina NGC 3532 open cluster in Carina Messier 83 galaxy in Hydra May 2013
Using NASA's infrared Spitzer Space Telescope, a group led by Daniel Apai (University of Arizona) detected planetary raw material--small olivine crystals and relatively large dust grains--around five brown dwarfs (one or two might be very-low-mass stars) in the constellation Chamaeleon. The central bodies are 1 to 3 million years old, about the age when astronomers expect particles in a protoplanetary disk to begin clumping together to form larger objects.
The far-southern polar region contains the obscure constellation Chamaeleon, which has no stars brighter than 4th magnitude.
Together they formulated 12 new southern constellations and named them after animals, people, shipboard instruments, and mythological creatures: Apus (Bird of Paradise), Chamaeleon (Chameleon), Dorado (Golden Fish), Grus (Crane), Hydrus (Water Serpent), Indus (American Indian), Musca (Fly), Pavo (Peacock), Phoenix, Triangulum Australe (Southern Triangle), Tucana (Toucan), and Volans (Flying Fish).