chair stand

chair stand

, chair-stand test (chăr) [O.Fr.]
The time it takes to rise from a seated position in a straight-backed chair to a standing position unsupported. The test may be performed in several ways. In one assessment the subject gets up from a chair five times, and the time it takes to complete these maneuvers is measured. In another assessment the number of times the patient can get up and down in 30 sec is counted. The test is one of several used in physical therapy and gerontology to assess balance, endurance, mobility, and strength.
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The shops remained closed, offices and warehouses were shut, the coach and chair stands were deserted, no carts or waggons rumbled through the slowly waking streets, the early cries were all hushed; a universal gloom prevailed.
Specifically, they found that weak upper body strength (handgrip strength) and poor lower body strength (longer duration to complete the repeated chair stand test) were associated with elevated depression and/or anxiety symptoms.
The functional capacity was evaluated using the tests proposed by Rikli & Jones (2001), which consists of the following parameters: Chair stand (CS), Arm curl (AC), Sitand-reach(SR), 2.44 mUp-and-go (TUG), Back scratch (BS) and 6 minutes walk test (6MW).
Addressing this situation, participants involved in hammock manufacturing developed hammock chair stand, an innovative alternative for traditional hammocks that can accommodate more than two people allowing the user to swing.
Physical function was measured by 4 fitness tests: (a) the 6-Minute Walk Test to evaluate aerobic fitness (4); (b) the Sit and Reach Test to evaluate flexibility (44); (c) the 8-ft Up and Go Test to determine balance, agility, and mobility (37); and (d) the 30-sec Chair Stand Test to evaluate lower limbs muscle strength (37).
The Timed Up and Go (TUG), the 30 Second Chair Stand test and the 4-Stage Balance test were used to measure mobility, muscle strength and falls risk (Jones, Rikli, & Beam, 1999; Podsiadlo & Richardson, 1991; Rossiter-Fornoff, Wolf, Wolfson, & Buchner, 1995).
Mobility tests included the chair stand test (how fast a person can stand up and sit down on a chair five times), the timed up-and-go test (the time it takes a person to get up from a chair, walk three meters [10 feet], return to the chair and sit down again), and walking a four-meter (13-foot.) course at the participants normal and fastest pace.
TimedUp and Go (TUG) [25], the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) (static balance, 4-meter walking speed and five-time chair stand) [26], 9-step stair climb 20 cm [27], and hip ROM [28] were assessed.
SFT comprises the following six components: (1) arm curl test (for upper body strength), (2) chair stand test (for lower body strength), (3) back scratch test (for upper body flexibility), (4) chair sit and reach test (for lower body flexibility), (5) eight foot up and go test (for agility/dynamic balance), and (6) 2-min step test (for aerobic endurance).
-9.2 for placebo; P = .7), and no differences in chair stand time (-1.1 for THA vs.
The test was then completed in this order: (1) Chair stand up for 30 seconds was used to assess lower-body strength, (2) Arm curl was used to assess upper-body strength, (3) Back scratch was used to assess upper-body (shoulder) flexibility, (4) Chair-sit-and-reach was used to assess the flexibility of the lower extremities, (5) Eight-foot-up-and-go was used to assess agility/dynamic balance as an index of basic mobility skills, and (6) The 6-minute walk test was used to assess aerobic capacity.