chain reaction


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Related to chain reaction: wiggle, Nuclear chain reaction

chain

 [chān]
a collection of objects linked together in linear fashion, or end to end, as the assemblage of atoms or radicals in a chemical compound, or an assemblage of individual bacterial cells.
branched chain an open chain of atoms, usually carbon, with one or more side chains attached to it.
closed chain several atoms linked together so as to form a ring, which may be saturated, as in cyclopentane, or aromatic, as in benzene.
H chain (heavy chain) any of the large polypeptide chains of five classes that, paired with the L or light chains, make up the antibody molecule of an immunoglobulin; heavy chains bear the antigenic determinants that differentiate the classes of immunoglobulins. See also heavy chain disease.
J chain a polypeptide occurring in polymeric IgM and IgA molecules.
L chain (light chain) either of the two small polypeptide chains (molecular weight 22,000) that, when linked to H or heavy chains by disulfide bonds, make up the antibody molecule of an immunoglobulin monomer; they are of two types, kappa and lambda, which are unrelated to immunoglobulin class differences.
open chain a series of atoms united in a straight line; components of this series are related to methane.
chain reaction a chemical reaction that is self-propagating; each time a free radical is destroyed a new one is formed.
side chain a group of atoms attached to a larger chain or to a ring.

chain re·ac·tion

a self-perpetuating process in which a product of one step in the reaction serves to bring about the next step in the reaction. Compare: autocatalysis, chain reflex.

chain re·ac·tion

(chān rē-ak'shŭn)
A self-perpetuating reaction in which a product of one step in the reaction itself serves to bring about the next step in the reaction, and so on.
Compare: autocatalysis

chain reaction

A self-sustaining reaction maintained by producing products that induce it. Neutrons produced by atomic fission in a mass of uranium can induce sustainable further fission of uranium atoms.

chain reaction

a chemical or atomic reaction in which the products of each state promote a subsequent reaction. Initially there is a slow induction period, but as the reaction progresses the reaction rate is accelerated.
References in periodicals archive ?
High sensitivity of detection of human malaria parasites by the use of nested polymerase chain reaction. Mol Biochem Parasitol.
Our goal with Chain Reaction was to create a publication for readers.
Investigation of varicella-zoster virus infection by polymerase chain reaction in the immunocompetent host with acute varicella.
None of the vaccine recipients had HPV 16 or CIN on at least two consecutive polymerase chain reaction tests, meaning that the vaccine was 100% effective, Dr.
Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov indicated Thursday Russia will continue conducting subcritical nuclear tests that do not cause sustained nuclear chain reactions.
Because of the potential unleashing of such power, Einstein suggested that FDR might think it desirable to have some permanent contact maintained between the administration and the group of physicists working on chain reactions in America."
Problems surfaced in July and spread like a chain reaction when a partner, ARM Financial Group, said it was losing money on guaranteed-investment contracts sold to pension funds, money markets and mutual funds.
The level of radiation on the surface of the processing tank, in which a self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction occurred, dropped to 25 millisieverts per hour, committee members said.
in a big, big way Like a chain reaction, the momentum that began a few years ago on the Upper East Side has spread throughout the city, from east to west, from uptown and, most recently, to Downtown.
Daghlian worked at what was known as the Omega Site, where technicians experimented with pushing hemispheres of plutonium together, then waited for a chain reaction to begin.
As early as 1932, it had occurred to the Hungarian born physicist Leo Szilard (1898-1964) that a nuclear chain reaction was also possible.
Minus the personal details and the upper-middle-class slant, this is the narrative, more or less, of Chain Reaction. As the Edsalls see it, Americans came together on race for a brief moment in the mid-sixties, but their buried misgivings and disagreements soon began to tear the country, and especially the Democrats, apart.