chagoma

cha·go·ma

(sha-gō'mă),
Small granuloma in the skin caused by early multiplication of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease).

cha·go·ma

(shah-gō'mă)
The skin lesion produced by acute Chagas disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
(10) Romana's sign, a swelling around the eye where the bug has bitten or a swelling elsewhere on the body termed a chagoma, are indications that an individual may have been exposed and should be tested for presence of the organisms.
During the acute stage, infected individuals may develop unspecific symptoms such as fever, nausea, diarrhea, and rash, as well as severe symptoms such as a raised inflammatory lesion at the site of parasite entry (chagoma), unilateral periorbital edema (Romana's sign), lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly [12].
The acute stage starts shortly after infection in which a localized skin nodule called a chagoma appears at the inoculation site.
Approximately 50% of symptomatic Chagas patients develop a chagoma, which can be described as a nodule or furuncle at the site of the bite (Roberts & Kemp, 2001).