chaetognath

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Related to chaetognaths: phylum Chaetognatha, arrow worms, Ctenophores

chaetognath

any small wormlike marine invertebrate of the phylum Chaetognatha, such as the arrowworms, which are INDICATOR SPECIES of water type.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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1873 discarded houses), chaetognaths Miraciinae Dana, 1846 Trichodesmium Ehrenberg ex (Distioculus Huys and Gomont, 1892 Bottger-Schnack, 1994, Macrosetella Scott, 1909, Mirada Dana, 1846, Oculosetella Dahl.
2A1, D, F) suggest that they grew similarly to the grasping spines of chaetognaths, by basal accretion of thin laminae (Szaniawski 2002).
(Trematoda: Didymozoidae) in the chaetognath Serratosagitta serratodentata (Krohn 1853) from Caribbean waters.
The ROV pilots were able to maneuver the 3300-kg vehicle and capture individual chaetognaths, even though the target specimens often tried to flee when sensing the motion of the approaching ROV.
Thus, for example, the chaetognaths of the genus Sagitta need only swim from time to time to maintain themselves at the desired depth, while mollusks of the genus Cavolinia have a heavy shell and must swim vigorously with their wing-shaped appendages to prevent themselves sinking.
1984), chaetognaths (Reeve and Cosper 1975), scleractinian corals (Heyward and Babcock 1986), and bivalves (Sastry 1979).
Some examples include arrow worms (or chaetognaths - see photo above) and amphipods (photo at right), which are voracious predators on copepods and larvae of larger species.
Included in the new assemblage of more than 1,000 specimens are the first representatives of modern chaetognaths (arrowworms) and ctenophores (jellyfish).
Copepodids and adults of Benthomisophria palliata Sars, 1909 gorged on zooplankters such as small copepods, chaetognaths, cnidarians, and radiolarians, at depths of 2,500 m to 4,000 m (Boxshall and Roe 1980).
Although copepods dominated the community in both periods, salps, siphonophores, chaetognaths and decapods, were more abundant during the first period, and because they are larger in size, probably contributed to the observed changes in size structure.
Eight groups accounted for 95% of total abundance both in January (copepods, chaetognaths, euphausiids, amphipods, polychaetes, pteropods, fish larvae and decapods) and May (copepods, amphipods, chaetognaths, euphausiids, decapods, pteropods, fish larvae and gasteropods).
The 10 prey categories were chaetognaths, euphausiids, amphipods, copepods, crab, miscellaneous, and pollock (<60 mm standard length [SL], 60-200 mm SL, [greater than or equal to]200 mm SL, and unmeasured).