cervical stenosis

cervical stenosis

Gynecology A block of the cervical canal due to a congenital defect or complications of surgery–eg, cryosurgery. See Cervix.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
And they got hit with another big loss when Larkin announced he had to stop playing because he has cervical stenosis. Though the school said the condition is not life-threatening, it causes a narrowing of the spinal canal in the neck and upper back.
He had a wife and a minor son.<br />The plaintiff had a spine condition known as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, or OPLL, which causes severe cervical stenosis and impingement of the spinal cord.
Patients were excluded from the study if they had undergone previous cervical cone biopsy or surgery requiring cervical tissue removal; cervical incompetence; a history of cervical laceration repair during vaginal birth; cervical stenosis; contraindications for the use of misoprostol (history of severe asthma, glaucoma, pre-existing cardiac disease, hypertension, or renal failure); or significant uterovaginal prolapse precluding the administration of vaginal tablets.
Endometrial sampling was performed using a Pipelle device, and dilatation and curettage was required for two patients due to cervical stenosis. After patients with endometrial hyperplasia or neoplasia were included in Group-I, and those with insufficient tissue, endometrial atrophy, or endometritis were included in Group-II; Groups 1 and 2 were compared with respect to primary and secondary outcomes.
However, excision of cervical tissue can result in cervical deficiency and increase the risk of miscarriage, preterm labour, preterm premature rupture of membranes [5, 6], and cervical stenosis. Furthermore, when the excision of dysplastic cells is incomplete, repeated treatment may be needed, increasing the risks.
However, radical trachelectomy itself sometimes causes infertility following cervical stenosis. Cervical stenosis may impact infertility care because patients suffer from great changes of menstrual patterns or even amenorrhea [16].
Treatment of cervical stenosis is indicated only if symptoms or uterine abnormalities are present and may involve cervical dilatation.
This may be most appropriate for patients who have had failed office attempts at sampling, have multiple medical comorbidities that limit the feasibility of office-based procedures (such as morbid obesity), or have severe cervical stenosis. D&C is associated with an increased risk for uterine perforation, compared with outpatient sampling procedures.
35(43.2%) patients had cervical spine stenosis secondary to osteophyte and hard disc, 15(18.5%) patients had cervical stenosis with soft discs at multiple levels, 10(12.3%) patients had ossified posterior longitudinal ligaments, 10(12.3%) patients had collapsed vertebra secondary to metastasis, 7(8.6%) patients had collapsed vertebra secondary to plasmacytoma and 4(4.9%) patients had collapsed vertebra secondary to old carries spine.
In one study of 57 women with a surgical diagnosis of endometriosis, uterosacral ligament abnormalities, lateral displacement of the cervix, and cervical stenosis were observed in 47%, 28%, and 19% of the women, respectively.
This table shows the complications of LEEP, most important early post-operative complication was bleeding per vaginum in 3.44% of patients, PID was seen in 1.72% and cervical stenosis was seen in 1.72% of patients.