cervical rib


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Related to cervical rib: cervical rib syndrome

rib

 [rib]
any of the paired bones, 12 on either side, extending from the thoracic vertebrae toward the median line on the ventral aspect of the trunk, forming the major part of the thoracic skeleton. Called also costa. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.
abdominal r's (asternal r's) false ribs.
cervical rib a supernumerary rib arising from a cervical vertebra.
false r's the five lower ribs on either side, not attached directly to the sternum.
floating r's the two lower false ribs on either side, usually without ventral attachment.
slipping rib one whose attaching cartilage is repeatedly dislocated.
true r's the seven upper ribs on either side, attached to both vertebrae and sternum.
vertebral r's floating ribs.
vertebrocostal r's the three upper false ribs on either side, attached to vertebrae and costal cartilages.
vertebrosternal r's true ribs.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cer·vi·cal rib

[MIM*117900]
[TA] a supernumerary rib articulating with a cervical vertebra, usually the seventh, but not reaching the sternum anteriorly.
See also: cervical rib syndrome.
Synonym(s): costa cervicalis [TA], costa colli [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cervical rib

A unilateral or bilateral congenital anomaly of the 1st thoracic rib or 7th cervical rib, affecting up to 0.5–1% of the population, 15% of whom have an associated thoracic outlet syndrome due to associated neural and arterial defects. Cervical ribs range from type I, a short bar extending from the transverse process, to type IV, a complete extra rib articulating with the sternum.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

cervical rib

A uni- or bilateral congenital anomaly of the 1st thoracic rib or 7th cervical rib, affecting up to 0.5–1% of the population, 15% of whom have an associated thoracic outlet syndrome–see there–due to associated neural and arterial defects; cervical ribs range from type I, a short bar extending from the transverse process to type IV, a complete extra rib articulating with the sternum.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cer·vi·cal rib

(sĕr'vi-kăl rib) [TA]
A supernumerary rib articulating with a cervical vertebra, usually the seventh, but not reaching the sternum anteriorly.
See also: cervical rib syndrome
Synonym(s): costa cervicalis [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cervical rib

A short, floating, rudimentary rib attached to the lowest neck vertebra on one or both sides. In about 10% of cases the rib causes compression of arteries or nerves in the neck, leading to pain and tingling, or sometimes more serious effects, in the arm or hand.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Hampe (1992) justifies its provisional inclusion of the specimen in the genus Kronosaurus based on the large size of the skeleton, the short neck with 12 vertebrae, the expanded opisthotic, the small and unpaired supraoccipital, and the cervical rib facets extending through the entire length of the centra.
It has also been reported that congenital abnormalities of the ribs are more common in women and on the right side.10 Cervical rib, being a supernumerary and accessory rib, develops from the 7th cervical vertebra.
Coote, "Pressure on the axillary vessels and nerve by an exostosis from cervical rib: interference with the circulation of the arm, removal of the rib and exostosis; recovery," Med Times Gazette, vol.
Cervical rib is usually asymptomatic and is detected as an incidental finding when a chest or neck x-ray is taken for some other purposes.
The most common abnormality was a postfixed brachial plexus, implying a large conjoined middle and inferior trunk, susceptible to pathological stretching over the 1st rib or an anomalous cervical rib. Prefixed brachial plexus anomalies were also fairly common in patients presenting with symptoms attributable to the higher nerve roots, or in patients whose symptoms were not distinctively attributable to specific nerve roots within the brachial plexus.
Previously, the name was designated according to the etiologies of compression, such as scalenus anticus, costoclavicular, hyperabduction, cervical rib, or first rib syndromes.
They have also found that the formation of cervical ribs were more common in North Sea woolly mammoths than in today's elephants and were astonished to find such numbers of cervical ribs among them.
Thrombolytic therapy is usually tried by catheter infusion of alteplase in the vein itself [7, 8], while decompression of the thoracic outlet by first or cervical rib resection, division of anomalous musculotendinous bands, and scalenectomy remain the ultimate treatment [7, 8].
The cervical rib. A predisposing factor for obstetric brachial plexus lesions.
Antero posterior radiograph revealed rudimentary cervical rib on right side and a developed cervical rib on left side [fig 2].
Abstract: A cervical rib, or supernumerary (extra) rib arising from the 7th cervical vertebra, is a congenital abnormality that occurs in less than 1% of the population.