myelopathy

(redirected from cervical myelopathy)
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Related to cervical myelopathy: Cervical Spondylosis

myelopathy

 [mi″ĕ-lop´ah-the]
1. any functional disturbance or pathological change in the spinal cord; often used to denote nonspecific lesions, as opposed to myelitis.
2. pathological bone marrow changes. adj., adj myelopath´ic.
ascending myelopathy myelopathy that progresses along the spinal cord towards the head.
cervical myelopathy compression myelopathy of the cervical spinal cord, a common complication of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.
compression myelopathy myelopathy due to pressure on the spinal cord, as from a tumor.
cystic myelopathy syringomyelia.
descending myelopathy myelopathy that progresses along the spinal cord towards the hips.
spondylotic cervical myelopathy myelopathy secondary to encroachment of cervical spondylosis upon a congenitally small cervical spinal canal.

my·e·lop·a·thy

(mī'ĕ-lop'ă-thē),
1. Disorder of the spinal cord.
2. A disease of the myelopoietic tissues.
[myelo- + G. pathos, suffering]

myelopathy

/my·elop·a·thy/ (mi″ĕ-lop´ah-the)
1. any functional disturbance and/or pathological change in the spinal cord; often used to denote nonspecific lesions, as opposed to myelitis.
2. pathological bone marrow changes.myelopath´ic

carcinomatous myelopathy  rapidly progressive degeneration or necrosis of the spinal cord associated with a carcinoma.
chronic progressive myelopathy  gradually progressive spastic paraparesis associated with infection by human T-lymphotropic virus 1.
HTLV-1–associated myelopathy  chronic progressive m.
paracarcinomatous myelopathy , paraneoplastic myelopathy carcinomatous m.
spondylotic cervical myelopathy  that secondary to encroachment of cervical spondylosis upon a congenitally small cervical spinal canal.
transverse myelopathy  that extending across the spinal cord.
vacuolar myelopathy  loss of myelin and spongy degeneration of the spinal cord with microscopic vacuolization, caused by infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

myelopathy

[mī′əlop′əthē]
1 any disease of the spinal cord.
2 any disease of the myelopoietic tissues.

myelopathy

A spinal cord disorder. See Vacuolar myelopathy.

my·e·lop·a·thy

(mī'ĕ-lop'ă-thē)
1. Disorder of the spinal cord.
2. A disease of the myelopoietic tissues.
[myelo- + G. pathos, suffering]

Myelopathy

A disorder in which the tissue of the spinal cord is diseased or damaged.
Mentioned in: Cervical Spondylosis

my·e·lop·a·thy

(mī'ĕ-lop'ă-thē)
1. Disorder of the spinal cord.
2. A disease of the myelopoietic tissues.
[myelo- + G. pathos, suffering]

myelopathy

1. any functional disturbance or pathological change in the spinal cord; often used to denote nonspecific lesions, as opposed to myelitis. Examples are ischemic encephalopathy, that due to intervertebral disk disease, in the wobbler syndrome in horses.
2. pathological change in bone marrow.

bovine spinal myelopathy
inherited disease of Murray Grey cattle conditioned by a recessive gene; congenital or appears at up to one year old; characterized by paresis progressing to recumbency and necropsy lesions of neuronal degeneration in midbrain, cerebellum and spinal cord.
degenerative myelopathy of German shepherd dogs
a slowly progressive ataxia and paresis of the hindlegs in older German shepherd dogs. Marked muscle atrophy is common and fecal and urinary incontinence often develops. The etiology is unknown, but an immune-mediated mechanism is suspected as a depression of T lymphocyte responsiveness has been demonstrated in affected dogs.
demyelinating myelopathy of Miniature poodles
a diffuse demyelination with sparing of spinal gray matter and dorsal and ventral nerve roots. There is a progressive weakness, then paralysis of hindlegs and later forelegs as well, beginning at a few months of age; believed to be inherited.
fibrocartilaginous embolic myelopathy
extrusion of degenerate intervertebral disk material into meningeal or intramedullary blood vessels, which results in an ischemic myelopathy. It occurs in horses and, most frequently, in large breeds of dogs, and is manifested by acute paresis or paralysis.
hereditary myelopathy of Afghan hounds
an autosomal recessive inherited degenerative myelopathy of young Afghan hounds, in which there is ataxia, paresis and eventually paralysis, first in the hindlimbs, then in the forelimbs as well. Called also a leukodystrophy.
spondylotic cervical myelopathy
myelopathy secondary to encroachment of cervical spondylosis upon a congenitally small cervical spinal canal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lee, "Spontaneous extradural pneumorrhachis causing cervical myelopathy," The Spine Journal, vol.
Cervical myelopathy in mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter's Syndrome).
Chavis, as having a cervical myelopathy secondary to severe cervical stenosis from levels C4-C7 of her cervical spine.
Marks and colleagues (48) showed a 31-week delay in diagnosis from the first signs of cervical myelopathy.
A 46-year-old woman presented for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion of C5/C6 and C6/C7 vertebrae to treat a cervical myelopathy.
Besides the symposia, the meeting will provide attendees with information on cervical myelopathy, anterior cervical surgery, biomechanics, spinal cord injuries, imaging/monitoring, cervical techniques and outcomes, trauma, tumors and infections.
Considering the treatment of neck pain with cervical manipulation, the GDC ultimately agreed with Gibbons and Tehan (11) in concluding that it is only specific space-occupying lesions that are neurologic contraindications; specifically where there is cervical myelopathy, overt spinal cord compression, or nerve root compression with an increasing neurologic deficit.
The expansive open-door laminoplasty (EOLP) has been proven effective in treating patients with cervical myelopathy caused by bony cervical stenosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.
Also, patients were excluded from the study if they required rapid sequence induction, had a history of previous difficult direct laryngoscopy and had uncontrolled hypertension, ischemic heart disease, acute or recent stroke or myocardial infarction, cervical spine instability or cervical myelopathy, symptomatic asthma or reactive airway disease and history of gastric reflux.
Herein, a new case of cervical myelopathy developing two years after the appearance of dropped head syndrome, as a sequel of isolated neck extensor myopathy, is presented and a brief review of the literature on the condition is also provided [11-14].
Juvenile Asymmetric Segmental spino-muscular Atrophy (JASSMA) of Distal Upper Extremity also called: Juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity (Hirayama disease) is a cervical myelopathy.