cervical mucus


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mucus

 [mu´kus]
the free slime of the mucous membrane, composed of the secretion of its glands, various salts, desquamated cells, and leukocytes.
cervical mucus that constituting the mucous membrane of the uterine cervix; it undergoes chemical and physical changes owing to hormone stimulation during the menstrual cycle and plays an important role in helping spermatozoa travel inwards after coitus. See also discussion of the cervical mucus method of contraception, under contraception.
fertile mucus see ovulation method of contraception.

cervical mucus

a secretion of the columnar epithelium lining the upper portion of the cervical canal of the uterus. The mucus that is secreted by endocervical glands changes in appearance and consistency throughout the menstrual cycle. For the first few days after menstruation, little mucus is secreted. As ovulation approaches, increasing amounts of sticky cloudy-white or yellowish secretions are seen. Around the time of ovulation, the volume of mucus increases, and it becomes clear, slippery, and elastic, resembling the uncooked white of an egg. After ovulation the mucus becomes cloudy, thick, sticky, and progressively less profuse until menstruation supervenes to begin the cycle again. See also mucous plug, ovulation method of family planning.

cervical mucus

Highly hydrated (90% water) mucus secreted by endocervical glands, which contains electrolytes (calcium, sodium, potassium), organic compounds (e.g., glucose, glycerol), amino acids, enzymes and other proteins. Cervical mucus acts as a barrier (“infertile mucus”) during the early menstrual cycle and as a transport medium for sperm after ovulation (“fertile mucus”), at which time the aqueous component of the mucus is higher. Dried “fertile mucus” displays a ferning pattern.

cervical mucus

Gynecology A viscous fluid that plugs the cervical os, and prevents sperm and bacteria from entering the uterus; at midcycle, under estrogenic influence, CM becomes thin, watery, and stringy, and allows free passage of sperm into the uterus. See Cervical mucus method, Cervix.

cervical

pertaining to the neck or to the cervix.

cervical ankylosis
ankylosis of the intervertebral joints. See also hypervitaminosis A.
cervical aplasia
segmental aplasia of the genital tract may be manifested by the absence or deformity of the cervix. Infertility is absolute. Diagnosis in large animals can be performed by rectal palpation; small animals may require surgical exploration.
cervical cirrhosis
caused by severe laceration at parturition; a rare cause of dystocia.
cervical curve
one of the vertebral curves of the body.
cervical dislocation
satisfactory method of euthanasia for laboratory mice, immature rats and poultry. Must be performed by an experienced person in order to achieve rapid and humane death.
cervical fixation
suturing of the cervix through the vaginal floor to the prepubic tendon. Used in the treatment of vaginal prolapse in cows.
cervical incompetence
damage to the cervix during parturition in the mare may cause its deformity and render it incapable of effectively closing off the uterus from the vagina. Infection of the uterus and infertility result.
incomplete cervical dilation
incomplete dilation of the cervix during parturition in adult cows, less commonly in heifers, may necessitate obstetrical, even cesarean, assistance; thought to be hormonal. See also ringwomb in ewes.
cervical inflammation
cervical instability, cervical malformation, cervical malarticulation
see canine wobbler syndrome.
cervical line lesions
of the tooth neck characterized by progressive, subgingival, osteoclastic resorption. These occur commonly in cats. See odontoclastic resorption.
cervical lymphadenitis
infection with abscessation of cervical lymph nodes in guinea pigs; usually caused by Streptococcus zooepidemicus.
cervical massage
suitable for use only in cows. The fetus is pulled up into the cervix and light traction maintained while a well-lubricated hand is pushed gently between the cervix and the fetus. This is done repeatedly and continued if there is no evidence of trauma. The cervix may dilate sufficiently to allow normal delivery of the calf.
cervical mucus
from the cervix. Its presence in liberal amounts is used as an indication of estrus.
cervical paralysis
inability to lift the head, usually accompanied by paralysis of all four limbs.
cervical plexus
see cervical plexus.
cervical rib
a supernumerary rib arising from a cervical vertebra.
cervical spinal cord lesion
includes fracture-dislocation, cervical vertebral abscess, compression due to exostosis, spinal myelitis and myelacia, congenital lesions including spinal canal stenosis.
cervical spine
cervical vertebrae.
cervical spondylolisthesis, spondylopathy
see canine wobbler syndrome.
cervical spondylosis
see cervical ankylosis (above).
cervical static stenosis
one of the two syndromes listed under cervical vertebral stenotic myelopathy; characterized by compression of the cord at C5 to C7 in large male horses 1-4 years of age; the position of the neck is immaterial; the resulting syndrome is characterized by an insidious onset of ataxia. See also enzootic equine incoordination.
cervical stenotic myelopathy
focal myelopathy caused by compression of the spinal cord by excessive flexion of the neck in patients, especially dogs, in which there is a pre-existing narrowing of one of the two vertebral foramina in one or more vertebrae, especially cervical vertebrae. See also degenerative myeloencephalopathy.
cervical swab
swab of the os cervix for bacterial and virological examination for pathogens likely to affect fertility adversely. Used in fertility examination of cases of prolonged infertility in ruminants. See also uterine swab.
cervical syndrome
clinical signs caused by a lesion of the spinal cord between C1 and C5. They include tetraparesis to tetraplegia or hemiparesis to hemiplegia, hyperreflexia, hypertonia, depressed postural responses and sometimes cervical pain.
cervical trauma
most common are lacerations during parturition; resulting adhesions and fibrosis may cause subsequent dystocia.
cervical vertebrae
the skeleton of the neck, in most mammals comprising seven vertebrae, in birds up to 25.
cervical vertebra fracture
in horses occurs as a result of head-on collisions at speed; causes recumbency and inability to move limbs voluntarily, but there is full consciousness and patient can eat and drink if assisted.
cervical vertebral malformation malarticulation syndrome
cervical vertebral stenotic myelopathy
one of the causes of incoordination in young horses. See also enzootic equine incoordination.
References in periodicals archive ?
The evaluation of the cervical mucus properties included the assessment of spinnbarkeit, ferning (crystallization), viscosity, and pH, according to the system devised by Moghissi [14].
The estrual cervical mucus was mixed with equal volume of PBS and mucolysed using magnetic stirrer for 5 minutes.
The progestin in the progestin-releasing IUD thickens the cervical mucus and blocks sperm.
It has been observed that the antisperm antibodies are responsible for reduced motility, decreased penetration of cervical mucus by sperm and blockage of acrosome reaction and thus intercepting sperm egg interaction.
The essence of total cervical occlusion is to preserve the cervical mucus plug and prevent ascending infection and subsequent initiation of miscarriage and preterm birth.
The traditional POPs contain levonorgestrel, norethisterone or ethynodiol diacetate and act mainly by cervical mucus thickening and endometrial atrophy.
The material for study were peripheral blood, serum, plasma lymphocytes, cervical mucus.
Evaluation of effectiveness of prophylactic cerclage of a short cervix according to interleukin-8 in cervical mucus.
Therefore, the aim of the present study was to describe whether abnormal cervical mucus discharge (A-CMD) or pathogens such as aerobic bacteria and fungi in CMD have effects on RP of cows and heifers in estrus.
A key but less well-known action of the female contraceptive pill is to thicken the cervical mucus and prevent sperm migration.
The copper also alters the content of the cervical mucus, inhibiting sperm penetration.