cervical mucus


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mucus

 [mu´kus]
the free slime of the mucous membrane, composed of the secretion of its glands, various salts, desquamated cells, and leukocytes.
cervical mucus that constituting the mucous membrane of the uterine cervix; it undergoes chemical and physical changes owing to hormone stimulation during the menstrual cycle and plays an important role in helping spermatozoa travel inwards after coitus. See also discussion of the cervical mucus method of contraception, under contraception.
fertile mucus see ovulation method of contraception.

cervical mucus

Highly hydrated (90% water) mucus secreted by endocervical glands, which contains electrolytes (calcium, sodium, potassium), organic compounds (e.g., glucose, glycerol), amino acids, enzymes and other proteins. Cervical mucus acts as a barrier (“infertile mucus”) during the early menstrual cycle and as a transport medium for sperm after ovulation (“fertile mucus”), at which time the aqueous component of the mucus is higher. Dried “fertile mucus” displays a ferning pattern.

cervical mucus

Gynecology A viscous fluid that plugs the cervical os, and prevents sperm and bacteria from entering the uterus; at midcycle, under estrogenic influence, CM becomes thin, watery, and stringy, and allows free passage of sperm into the uterus. See Cervical mucus method, Cervix.
References in periodicals archive ?
Physical properties of bovine cervical mucus during normal and induced (progesterone and/or PGF2alpha) estrus.
Methods to approximate when a woman is fertile are usually based on the menstrual cycle, changes in cervical mucus, or changes in body temperature.
Their advice to women was not to rely on calendar dates to determine their fertile window (good advice in my opinion), but not once in the entire article did the authors mention that the "fertile window" had to do with cervical mucus. (For some "historical" reading on this topic, readers might consult Billings et al.
Besides changes in cervical mucus and basal temperature, other signs of approaching ovulation include tenderness and a slight increase in size of the breasts, pain in the lower abdomen, a tendency to be more emotional, and an increase in sexual desire.
Helpful as it is, the cervical mucus test is no more than a model.
A sperm invasion test checks the interaction between your sperm and your partner's cervical mucus when examined under a microscope.
This means the couple is monitoring the woman's cycle with basal body temperature or other predictors such as evaluating the cervical mucus with the "clear plan" fertility monitor.
The progestin in the progestin- releasing IUD thickens the cervical mucus and blocks sperm.
We also agree that retention of the cervical mucus may be an important issue and we always take special care to avoid/ minimize manipulations in the cervical canal that may disturb or dislodge the cervical mucus.
Thus, quantitation of immunoglobulins in the serum and cervical mucus of infertile women is of significance (14, 15).
Partly true - Women who take longer to conceive are more likely to have thicker cervical mucus, and boy sperm swim better in thicker mucus.