cervical lordosis

cervical lordosis

[TA]
the normal, anteriorly convex curvature of the cervical segment of the vertebral column; cervical lordosis is a secondary curvature of the vertebral column, acquired postnatally as the infant lifts its head.
Synonym(s): lordosis cervicis [TA], lordosis colli

cer·vi·cal lor·do·sis

(sĕr'vi-kăl lōr-dō'sis) [TA]
The normal, anteriorly convex curvature of the cervical segment of the vertebral column; a secondary curvature, acquired postnatally as the infant lifts its head.
Synonym(s): lordosis cervicis [TA] , lordosis colli.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cervical lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis are the major components of the physiological curvatures of the spine in the sagittal plane.
If that angle possesses lower values then it stands for limiting the cervical lordosis, a higher angulation of the lower segments, and increasing the compressive forces of that area [18,11].
In the surgical treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy, PEEK cages are superior to titanium cages in maintaining cervical lordosis and intervertebral height, resulting in good clinical results.23 In our study we tried to compare the results of ACDF procedure with titanium and PEEK cages.
Decreased Vertebral Artery Hemodynamics in Patients with Loss of Cervical Lordosis. Medical Science Monitor.
Reliability of cervical lordosis measurement techniques on long-cassette radiographs.
MR imaging findings reported in patients from South-East Asia and Japan include loss of attachment (LOA) of the dura to the lamina, asymmetric lower cervical spinal cord atrophy, spinal cord T2 hyperintensity, loss of cervical lordosis in the neutral position and forward displacement of the dura with flexion MR imaging.
Festa [6] found the relationship between cervical lordosis and cranial base and mandibular length.
Martensmeier (1992)11 showed that before treatment nearly half of the Class I and Class II patients had a marked cervical lordosis, whereas Class III patients had abnormal kyphosis.
According to our results, the anterior translation of the head might accompany cranial flexion as well as a flattening of the cervical lordosis. To balance the extensor moment produced by the flexed head, the extensor muscles need to produce additional extension torque and the fatigue of these muscles might lead to neck or upper back symptoms.
The visual analogue scale (VAS), cervical lordosis, and clinical symptom score were assessed as the secondary outcome measures.
[5] found that children with skeletal class III showed a significantly lower angle of cervical lordosis than those with class I and II.