cervical incompetence


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Related to cervical incompetence: Cervical cerclage

cervical incompetence

Incompetent cervical os Gynecology A condition characterized by dilation and effacement of uterine cervix in later pregnancy which may be associated with spontaneous abortion and prematurity Frequency 1-2% of all pregnancies; causes 20-25% of 2nd trimester abortions Clinical Vaginal bleeding or spotting; sensation of lower abdominal weightRisk factors Prior cervical surgery or previous difficult vaginal delivery, cervical malformation, DES exposure, multigestation Management Cerclage. See Cerclage.

cervical incompetence

Structural inability of the cervical os to remain closed and support a growing fetus. This problem has commonly been associated with recurrent spontaneous second-trimester abortions. A higher incidence of this structural abnormality is noted after cervical trauma, e.g., previous vaginal or cesarean births, cervical laceration, conization of the cervix. It also has been reported among daughters whose mothers were treated with diethylstilbestrol (DES) during their pregnancies. Traditionally, cerclage has been used for treatment even though controlled trials of its effectiveness have not been uniformly successful.
See: cerclage; Shirodkar operation
See also: incompetence

cervical incompetence

The inability of the inner opening of the neck of the womb to remain properly closed. This is a cause of repeated, painless, spontaneous abortions around the fourth or fifth month of pregnancy and affects about one pregnancy in 100. This can be prevented with a temporary encircling stitch (a Shirodkar suture), but the difficulty is to know which women are likely to be affected. Women with a history of mid-term miscarriage are obvious candidates for cerclage. The procedure can be done as an emergency if threatened miscarriage is detected in time.

cervical

pertaining to the neck or to the cervix.

cervical ankylosis
ankylosis of the intervertebral joints. See also hypervitaminosis A.
cervical aplasia
segmental aplasia of the genital tract may be manifested by the absence or deformity of the cervix. Infertility is absolute. Diagnosis in large animals can be performed by rectal palpation; small animals may require surgical exploration.
cervical cirrhosis
caused by severe laceration at parturition; a rare cause of dystocia.
cervical curve
one of the vertebral curves of the body.
cervical dislocation
satisfactory method of euthanasia for laboratory mice, immature rats and poultry. Must be performed by an experienced person in order to achieve rapid and humane death.
cervical fixation
suturing of the cervix through the vaginal floor to the prepubic tendon. Used in the treatment of vaginal prolapse in cows.
cervical incompetence
damage to the cervix during parturition in the mare may cause its deformity and render it incapable of effectively closing off the uterus from the vagina. Infection of the uterus and infertility result.
incomplete cervical dilation
incomplete dilation of the cervix during parturition in adult cows, less commonly in heifers, may necessitate obstetrical, even cesarean, assistance; thought to be hormonal. See also ringwomb in ewes.
cervical inflammation
cervical instability, cervical malformation, cervical malarticulation
see canine wobbler syndrome.
cervical line lesions
of the tooth neck characterized by progressive, subgingival, osteoclastic resorption. These occur commonly in cats. See odontoclastic resorption.
cervical lymphadenitis
infection with abscessation of cervical lymph nodes in guinea pigs; usually caused by Streptococcus zooepidemicus.
cervical massage
suitable for use only in cows. The fetus is pulled up into the cervix and light traction maintained while a well-lubricated hand is pushed gently between the cervix and the fetus. This is done repeatedly and continued if there is no evidence of trauma. The cervix may dilate sufficiently to allow normal delivery of the calf.
cervical mucus
from the cervix. Its presence in liberal amounts is used as an indication of estrus.
cervical paralysis
inability to lift the head, usually accompanied by paralysis of all four limbs.
cervical plexus
see cervical plexus.
cervical rib
a supernumerary rib arising from a cervical vertebra.
cervical spinal cord lesion
includes fracture-dislocation, cervical vertebral abscess, compression due to exostosis, spinal myelitis and myelacia, congenital lesions including spinal canal stenosis.
cervical spine
cervical vertebrae.
cervical spondylolisthesis, spondylopathy
see canine wobbler syndrome.
cervical spondylosis
see cervical ankylosis (above).
cervical static stenosis
one of the two syndromes listed under cervical vertebral stenotic myelopathy; characterized by compression of the cord at C5 to C7 in large male horses 1-4 years of age; the position of the neck is immaterial; the resulting syndrome is characterized by an insidious onset of ataxia. See also enzootic equine incoordination.
cervical stenotic myelopathy
focal myelopathy caused by compression of the spinal cord by excessive flexion of the neck in patients, especially dogs, in which there is a pre-existing narrowing of one of the two vertebral foramina in one or more vertebrae, especially cervical vertebrae. See also degenerative myeloencephalopathy.
cervical swab
swab of the os cervix for bacterial and virological examination for pathogens likely to affect fertility adversely. Used in fertility examination of cases of prolonged infertility in ruminants. See also uterine swab.
cervical syndrome
clinical signs caused by a lesion of the spinal cord between C1 and C5. They include tetraparesis to tetraplegia or hemiparesis to hemiplegia, hyperreflexia, hypertonia, depressed postural responses and sometimes cervical pain.
cervical trauma
most common are lacerations during parturition; resulting adhesions and fibrosis may cause subsequent dystocia.
cervical vertebrae
the skeleton of the neck, in most mammals comprising seven vertebrae, in birds up to 25.
cervical vertebra fracture
in horses occurs as a result of head-on collisions at speed; causes recumbency and inability to move limbs voluntarily, but there is full consciousness and patient can eat and drink if assisted.
cervical vertebral malformation malarticulation syndrome
cervical vertebral stenotic myelopathy
one of the causes of incoordination in young horses. See also enzootic equine incoordination.
References in periodicals archive ?
Until research can provide objective definitions and criteria for using and evaluating cerclages, it would at least be helpful if a consensus panel of experts would convene to create a semiobjective grading and scoring system for cervical incompetence along the lines of the Bishop score for cervical ripening, Dr.
Wide adoption of the point system could improve research on cervical incompetence and the data used to hone the accuracy of the system.
Usually, women with repeated midtrimester pregnancy losses from cervical incompetence are given a transvaginal cerclage early in the second trimester of pregnancy.
There were 10 pregnancy losses in the no-cerclage group that appeared consistent with a diagnosis of incompetent cervix; when taken together with the 29 women in the cerclage group presumed to have an incompetent cervix, the overall rate of cervical incompetence in the study was 4.
Cerclage was introduced in the 1950s as a therapy for cervical incompetence, and it's generally accepted by most obstetricians as an effective therapy "Yet randomized controlled trials of its adequacy in patients with a history of cervical incompetence are lacking," Dr.
Clinicians have to understand that the cervical changes we see on ultrasound do not necessarily mean cervical incompetence.
In fact, a transvaginal ultrasound is superior to a digital exam in assessing a patient with cervical incompetence, according to Dr.

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