cerium

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cerium

 (Ce) [sēr´e-um]
a chemical element, atomic number 58, atomic weight 140.12. (See Appendix 6.)
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ce·ri·um (Ce),

(sēr'ē-ŭm),
A metallic element, atomic no. 58, atomic wt. 140.115.
[fr. Ceres, the planetoid]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ce·ri·um

(Ce) (sēr'ē-ŭm)
A metallic element, atomic no. 58, atomic wt. 140.115.
[fr. Ceres, the planetoid]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ce·ri·um

(Ce) (sēr'ē-ŭm)
A metallic element, atomic no. 58, atomic wt. 140.115.
[fr. Ceres, the planetoid]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The dried cerous carbonate as the precursor for the Ce[O.sub.2] preparation was a finely crystalline powder containing (according to the X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis) a mixture of amorphous and poorly crystalline normal and basic carbonates, whose exact chemical composition (formula) could not be established.
Even if ceric species near the anode can be transported in low concentration to the anode, upon reduction and in the presence of chloride they may become soluble cerous species to be washed away from the anode by adventitious water and cannot precipitate as an insoluble salt to further passivate the corrosion site.
This method is similar to that proposed by PAMM (Program Against Micronutrient Malnutrition), where both are based on the Sandell-Kolthoff method that utilizes the fact that iodine catalyses the reduction of ceric (IV) ions to cerous (III) ions by arsenic in acidic conditions.
Many methods for assessing urinary iodine exist (3-8), most based on the Sandell-Kolthoff reaction (9), in which iodide catalyzes the reduction of ceric ammonium sulfate (yellow) to the colorless cerous form in the presence of arsenious acid.
His master's thesis in Chemistry was titled, "Cerous Sulfate as a Reagent for the Detection of Alkali Metal Ions" (1956).