cerivastatin


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cerivastatin

 [sĕ-riv´ah-stat″in]
an inhibitor of an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of cholesterol; used as an adjunct in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. Withdrawn in the United States because it is associated with an increased risk for rhabdomyolysis.

cerivastatin

an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (Baycol) withdrawn from the market in August 2001 after several cases of fatal rhabdomyolysis.

cerivastatin

Baycol® Cardiology Cholesterol-lowering, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor/statin for managing hypercholesterolemia and mixed dyslipidemia; it ↑ HDL-C and ↓ LDL-C; withdrawn from the market as it was linked to rhabdomyolysis. See Statin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further studies showed that atorvastatin, cerivastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin and simvastatin stimulated cultured bone cells to make the osteogenic bone-morphogenic protein (BMP)-2.
25,26,41-43) In fact, the concurrent use of gemfibrozil (Lopid), a fibric acid derivative, was associated with 1/3 of rhabdomyolysis related deaths in patients using cerivastatin.
Influence of Coenzyme Q(10) and Cerivastatin on the Flow-Mediated Vasodilation of the Brachial Artery: Results of the ENDOACT Study," Int.
9) Cerivastatin, which has been withdrawn, is also a substrate of CYPA34.
A noticeably downward monthly trend was observed across physician groups, likely reflecting the loss of marketshare to other statins, including the newly launched cerivastatin.
Similarly, when pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, cerivastatin, fluvastatin, and lovastatin were considered individually, none of the agents reduced the risk of cancer or cancer death.
Similarly, when pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvas-tatin, cerivastatin, fluvas-tatin, and lovastatin were considered individually, none of the agents reduced the risk of cancer or cancer death.
Bayer's cerivastatin (Baycol) was also a synthetic statin, but it was removed from the market because of side effects.
The anticholesterol drug cerivastatin, sold under the brand name Baycol, was the most potent medicine in its class in the late 1990s.
Recently, a statin medication, cerivastatin (Baycol[R]) was withdrawn due to its association with two deaths from rhabdomyolysis.
For instance, when the cholesterol-lowering cerivastatin appeared on the market, there were already three similar drugs with a long history that could lower cholesterol and reduce heart attacks, After about six years on the market, cerivastatin was withdrawn when it caused 52 deaths from severe muscle damage.
Results: The effect of the sterol-ester margarine (Take Control[R]) and cerivastatin together was additive (39% reduction in LDL cholesterol).