cerebrovascular


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cerebrovascular

 [ser″ĕ-bro-vas´ku-ler]
pertaining to the blood vessels of the cerebrum, or brain.

cer·e·bro·vas·cu·lar

(ser'ĕ-brō-vas'kyū-lăr),
Relating to the blood supply to the brain, particularly with reference to pathologic changes.

cerebrovascular

(sĕr′ə-brō-văs′kyə-lər, sə-rē′brō-)
adj.
Of or relating to the blood vessels that supply the brain.

cerebrovascular

adjective Referring to the cerebral blood vessels.

cerebrovascular

adjective Relating to cerebral blood vessels

cer·e·bro·vas·cu·lar

(ser'ĕ-brō-vas'kyū-lăr)
Relating to the blood supply to the brain, particularly with reference to pathologic changes.

cerebrovascular

Pertaining to the blood vessels supplying the brain.

cer·e·bro·vas·cu·lar

(ser'ĕ-brō-vas'kyū-lăr)
Relating to blood supply to brain, particularly with reference to pathologic changes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Having had an ischemic stroke -- in which blood flow to the brain is blocked -- is probably the most serious cerebrovascular risk factor, according to Navi.
"Because many cerebrovascular risk factors are modifiable, and both Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease impose considerable public health burdens, these hypothesis-generating results should prompt translational research efforts to evaluate the effects of vascular disease on the pathobiology of Parkinson disease," the authors write.
50 Patients who had clinical & CT scan findings of cerebrovascular accident.
The genetic sequencing of the 27 related genes of hereditary cerebrovascular disease were conducted.
Age and hypertension are well-known to increase the prevalence rate of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.
The projection for cerebrovascular diseases in LMICs is that of a continuous and steep rise.
There has been increasing recognition of injury to the cerebrovascular vessels in the context of blunt trauma.
Individuals who were overweight but metabolically healthy had a 30% increased risk of ischemic heart disease, 11% increased risk of heart failure, and the same risk of cerebrovascular disease as normal-weight, healthy individuals.
All patients with prior chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease or with previous cerebrovascular events were excluded from the study.