cerebrospinal


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Related to cerebrospinal: cerebrospinal meningitis, cerebrospinal fever

cerebrospinal

 [ser″ĕ-bro-spi´nal]
pertaining to the brain and spinal cord.
cerebrospinal fluid the fluid within the subarachnoid space, the central canal of the spinal cord, and the four ventricles of the brain. The fluid is formed continuously by the choroid plexus in the ventricles, and, so that there will not be an abnormal increase in amount and pressure, it is reabsorbed into the blood by the arachnoid villi at approximately the same rate at which it is produced.

The cerebrospinal fluid aids in the protection of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges by acting as a watery cushion surrounding them to absorb the shocks to which they are exposed. There is a blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier that prevents harmful substances, such as metal poisons, some pathogenic organisms, and certain drugs from passing from the capillaries into the cerebrospinal fluid.

The normal cerebrospinal fluid pressure is 5 mm Hg (100 mm H2O) when the individual is lying in a horizontal position on his side. Fluid pressure may be increased by a brain tumor or by hemorrhage or infection in the cranium. hydrocephalus, or excess fluid in the cranial cavity, can result from either excessive formation or poor absorption of cerebrospinal fluid. Blockage of the flow of fluid in the spinal canal may result from a tumor, blood clot, or severance of the spinal cord. The pressure remains normal or decreases below the point of obstruction but increases above that point.

Cell counts, bacterial smears, and cultures of samples of cerebrospinal fluid are done when an inflammatory process or infection of the meninges is suspected. Since the cerebrospinal fluid contains nutrient substances such as glucose, proteins, and sodium chloride, and also some waste products such as urea, it is believed to play a role in metabolism. The major constituents of cerebrospinal fluid are water, glucose, sodium chloride, and protein. Information about changes in their concentrations is helpful in diagnosis of brain diseases.

Samples of cerebrospinal fluid may be obtained by lumbar puncture, in which a hollow needle is inserted between two lumbar vertebrae (below the lower end of the spinal cord), or into the cisterna cerebellomedullaris just below the occipital bone of the skull (cisternal puncture). Pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid is measured by a manometer attached to the end of the needle after it has been inserted.

cer·e·bro·spi·nal

(ser'ĕ-brō-spī'năl), Avoid the erroneous phrase cerebral spinal.
Relating to the brain and the spinal cord.

cerebrospinal

/cer·e·bro·spi·nal/ (-spi´n'l) pertaining to the brain and spinal cord.

cerebrospinal

(sĕr′ə-brō-spī′nəl, sə-rē′brō-)
adj.
Of or relating to the brain and spinal cord.

cerebrospinal

[ser′əbrōspī′nəl, sərē′brō-]
pertaining to or involving the brain and the spinal cord.

cer·e·bro·spi·nal

(ser'ĕ-brō-spī'năl)
Relating to the brain and the spinal cord.

cerebrospinal

Pertaining to both the brain and the spinal cord.

cerebrospinal

pertaining to the brain and spinal cord.

cerebrospinal abscess
see brain abscess.
cerebrospinal angiopathy
is thought to be a sequel to subclinical edema disease due to an Escherichia coli toxemia of pigs. The disease is sporadic within a group and is characterized by incoordination, apathy, aimless walking and circling. Emaciation occurs rapidly and most affected animals are euthanatized on humanitarian grounds.
cerebrospinal dysmyelinogenesis
a characteristic lesion in the brain of newborn piglets affected by congenital tremor caused by swine fever infection of the dam during early pregnancy. See also congenital tremor syndrome of piglets.
cerebrospinal embolism
uncommon in animals. May result from marrow escaping into the circulation from a fracture site, or cartilage from a nucleus pulposus disruption. Usually in a ventral spinal artery causing a sudden onset of paralysis.
cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)
the fluid within the subarachnoid space, the central canal of the spinal cord, and the four ventricles of the brain. The fluid is formed continuously by the choroid plexus in the ventricles, and is reabsorbed into the blood by the arachnoid villi at approximately the same rate at which it is produced.
Examination of the CSF for the presence of abnormal or excessive numbers of cells, protein content, pressure is an important source of information about the nervous system.
cerebrospinal fluid-blood barrier
CSF passes into the CSF system (brain ventricles, the central canal of the spinal cord and the subarachnoid space) at the choroid plexus and passes out of the subarachnoid space into the sagittal sinus. The confining membranes of the system control selectively the passage of certain materials between it and the brain tissue (CSF-brain barrier) and between it and the blood (CSF-blood barrier).
cerebrospinal fluid-brain barrier
see cerebrospinal fluid-blood barrier (above).
cerebrospinal nematodiasis
invasion of the central nervous system by the microfilaria of Setaria labiatopapillosa (S. digitata) in most species causes an acute focal encephalomyelomalacia. The clinical picture is one of incoordination, then paralysis of the limbs, especially the hinds. S. equina may cause endophthalmitis in horses by similar invasion.
cerebrospinal thrombosis
see cerebrospinal embolism (above).
cerebrospinal vasculitis
References in periodicals archive ?
Extensive coverage of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Management products under development - The report reviews details of major pipeline products which includes, product description, licensing and collaboration details and other developmental activities - The report reviews the major players involved in the development of Cerebrospinal Fluid Management products and list all their pipeline projects - The coverage of pipeline products based on various stages of development ranging from Early Development to Approved / Issued stage - The report provides key clinical trial data of ongoing trials specific to pipeline products - Recent developments in the segment / industry
Immunofixation to quantify beta 2-transferrin in cerebrospinal fluid to detect leakage of cerebrospinal fluid from skull injury.
multiple cerebrospinal fluid bands: multiple sclerosis?
Treatment of intrathecal methotrexate overdose with folinic acid rescue and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid exchange: a report of two cases.
thought to be bound to LY2062430, in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid.
Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)is produced in the brain to protect the brain and spinal cord, and to carry away waste from brain cells.
Most cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks originate in traumatic, infectious, or congenital temporal bone defects.
Although recent reports have found elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines in brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of autistic patients, no studies to date have specifically examined the level of tumor necrosis factor--[alpha] (TNF-[alpha]) in patients with autistic regression, Dr.
Complications in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid shunting.
My first project was to develop a rapid and accurate micromethod for measuring protein concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid and urine.
He and his colleagues gave six young, healthy volunteers a modified form of the amino acid leucine, a building block of amyloid-beta, and then monitored their cerebrospinal fluid with a spinal tap.
Biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid may indicate whether patients with mild cognitive impairment will progress to Alzheimer's disease and could assist in the development of new screening tools or treatments, according to Dr.