degeneration

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degeneration

 [de-gen″ĕ-ra´shun]
deterioration; change from a higher to a lower form, especially change of tissue to a lower or less functionally active form. When there is chemical change of the tissue itself, it is true degeneration; when the change consists in the deposit of abnormal matter in the tissues, it is infiltration. adj., adj degen´erative.
caseous degeneration caseation (def. 2).
cerebromacular degeneration (cerebroretinal degeneration)
1. degeneration of brain cells and of the macula retinae, as occurs in tay-sachs disease.
2. any lipidosis with cerebral lesions and degeneration of the retinal macula.
colloid degeneration degeneration with conversion of the tissues into a gelatinous or gumlike material.
cystic degeneration degeneration with formation of cysts.
fatty degeneration deposit of fat globules in a tissue.
fibroid degeneration degeneration of a leiomyoma with subsequent fibrosis.
hepatolenticular degeneration Wilson's disease.
hyaline degeneration a regressive change in cells in which the cytoplasm takes on a homogeneous, glassy appearance; also used loosely to describe the histologic appearance of tissues.
hydropic degeneration a form in which the epithelial cells absorb much water.
lattice degeneration of retina a frequently bilateral, usually benign asymptomatic condition, characterized by patches of fine gray or white lines that intersect at irregular intervals in the peripheral retina, usually associated with numerous, round, punched-out areas of retinal thinning or retinal holes.
macular degeneration see macular degeneration.
macular degeneration, congenital see stargardt's disease.
macular degeneration, Stargardt's stargardt's disease.
mucoid degeneration degeneration with deposit of myelin and lecithin in the cells.
mucous degeneration degeneration with accumulation of mucus in epithelial tissues.
myofibrillar degeneration damage to selective cardiac cells when surrounding interstitial cells, nerves, and capillaries remain viable.
myxomatous degeneration mucous degeneration.
spongy degeneration of central nervous system (spongy degeneration of white matter) Canavan disease.
subacute combined degeneration of spinal cord degeneration of both the posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord, producing various motor and sensory disturbances; it is due to vitamin B12 deficiency and is usually associated with pernicious anemia. Called also Lichtheim's or Putnam-Dana syndrome.
wallerian degeneration fatty degeneration of a nerve fiber that has been severed from its nutritive source.
Zenker's degeneration Zenker's necrosis.

de·gen·er·a·tion

(dē-jen'ĕr-ā'shŭn), Negative or pejorative connotatoins of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
1. Deterioration; passing from a higher to a lower level or type.
2. A worsening of mental, physical, or moral qualities.
3. A retrogressive pathologic change in cells or tissues in consequence of which their functions are often impaired or destroyed; sometimes reversible; necrosis results in the early stages. Synonym(s): retrograde metamorphosis
Synonym(s): degeneratio
See: anterograde, retrograde.
[L. degeneratio]

degeneration

(dĭ-jĕn′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. The process of degenerating.
2. The state of being degenerate.
3. Medicine Gradual deterioration of specific tissues, cells, or organs with corresponding impairment or loss of function, caused by injury, disease, or aging.
4. Biology The evolutionary decline or loss of a function, characteristic, or structure in an organism or species.

degeneration

Medtalk The deterioration or compromise in function of a part. See Age-related macular degeneration, Ballooning degeneration, Fatty degeneration, Feathery degeneration, Granulovacuolar degeneration, Hereditary degeneration, Liquefactive degeneration, Macular degeneration, Myxoid degeneration, Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, Red degeneration, Spongy degeneration of infancy, Wallerian degeneration, Waxy degeneration.

de·gen·er·a·tion

(dĕ-jen'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
1. Deterioration; passing from a higher to a lower level or type.
2. A worsening of mental, physical, or moral qualities.
3. A retrogressive pathologic change in cells or tissues, in consequence of which their functions are often impaired or destroyed; sometimes reversible; in the early stages, necrosis results.
[L. degeneratio]

degeneration

Structural regression of body tissue or organs, from disease, ageing or misuse, which leads to functional impairment, usually progressive.

degeneration

the loss or reduction in size of an organ during the lifetime of an organism, or during the course of evolution. The latter process may give rise to a vestigial organ, e.g. the human appendix.

Degeneration

Gradual, progressive loss of nerve cells.

degeneration

Deterioration of tissue or organ resulting in reduced efficiency. Examples: degeneration of the cornea; degeneration of the retina. See corneal dystrophy.
age-related macular degeneration See age-related macular degeneration.
cobblestone degeneration See paving-stone degeneration.
cone degeneration See cone dystrophy.
Doyne's honeycombed degeneration See familial dominant drusen.
lattice degeneration of the retina See lattice degeneration of the retina.
lipid droplet degeneration See actinic keratopathy.
paving-stone degeneration Discrete, yellowish round areas of retinal thinning and depigmentation located near the ora serrata. The underlying choroid may be seen. It is a benign degeneration occurring with advancing age. Syn. cobblestone degeneration; peripheral chorioretinal degeneration.
pellucid marginal degeneration A rare condition characterized by bilateral, slowly progressive thinning and protrusion of the inferior peripheral cornea. The involved area is clear (hence the word pellucid), but the condition may be complicated by hydrops and the central cornea typically develops against the rule astigmatism. Treatment usually consists of gas permeable scleral lenses, but keratoplasty may be necessary. See corneal ectasia; hydrops; keratoconus.
peripheral chorioretinal degeneration See paving-stone degeneration.
peripheral cystoid degeneration A degenerative process in the peripheral retina that occurs almost universally in the elderly. It consists of numerous, discrete cystic spaces in the outer plexiform or inner nuclear layer presenting a frothy appearance. The degeneration starts at the ora serrata and slowly progresses to the peripheral retina. If the cysts should join together, degenerative retinoschisis develops. It is not usually associated with retinal tears. The condition does not require any treatment.
Salzmann's nodular degeneration A degenerative condition characterized by bluish-white, elevated nodules on the surface of the cornea. It may occur in people previously affected by trachoma, phlyctenular keratitis, vernal keratitis or keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Most cases are asymptomatic, but if the nodules impair vision, keratoplasty may be necessary.
senile macular degeneration See age-related macular degeneration.
tapetoretinal degeneration A hereditary degeneration affecting the photoreceptors of the retina or the pigment epithelium layer. Some authors also include the choroid. Syn. tapetoretinopathy. See choroideremia; retinitis pigmentosa.
Terrien's marginal degeneration See corneal ectasia.
vitreoretinal degeneration See Wagner's disease; Stickler's syndrome.

Patient discussion about degeneration

Q. Is bipolar degenerative? Does it get worse with age? What can I do with this? Is bipolar degenerative? Does it get worse with age? I am with type II but I get in to severe depression at times. My mania is in short spurts but increasing in intensity. What can I do with this?

A. Thank you for sharing your experience richguys... I hope that you find a treatment soon that eleviates the symptoms you have been experiencing... I'll be thinking about you.

Q. Is degenerative disc disease and arthritis the same thing? My husband was recently in a auto accident at work. They did a CT Scan of his head and neck. The doctor said that the CT Scan found that he has arthritis in his neck. After receiving the report ourselves to take to another doctor it reads: "There is minimal early degenerative disc disease with osteophyte formation predominately at C5-6. " My husband never had a problem with his neck before the accident

A. I was suffering from pain for 2 years and undergoing numerous test for causes when a trip to a neurologist for migraines gave me an answer. FINALLY! This was in July of this year so I am still learning and finding out about fibromyalgia but I do know in the last couple of years there has been a greater acceptance BUT there are still a lot of doctors not being supportive (from experience and talking with others) and the public in general can be unaccepting b/c you look healthy, seem to be healthy and they can not understand why you are in pain that "can't be explained!" I encourage suffers of fibro to find support within their peers! it really helps to talk to people that understand! That's what brought me to this site to start with and I am so glad I found it!

Q. I am interested in information on working with fibromyalgiaI am having problems just coping at home! I have had 2 c-spine surgeries in 2 years, have degenerative disc disease, maigrains with nuurological tendencies, fatigue, deppression and fibromyalgia. I can't stand for long , sit for long, just making it through my daily life is stressful enough how do people manage to work? I have been off since August of last year but wan to feel well enough so I can return to the working world, Any suggestions? Tried Lyrica, doctor took me off the side affects for me were terrible!

A. I had a cervical spinal fusion, C4-5,C5-6 and a SLAP repair of my left shoulder. Initially after the fusion the headaches and tinlging went away and then 4 months later, while in a PT work conditioning prorgam, the headaches returned, along with nausea, vomiting and vertigo. My doctor basically ignored the symptoms for the last 5 months and I was finally referred to a neurologist who is treating me with Lyrica and Imitrex. The side effects are brutal and it has come done to living with the headaches and other symptoms vs. living in a fog unable to function. I have come to realize that there is no magic "fix" and all the meds mask the stymptoms temporarily but it's a tradeoff when you consider the side effects and possible long term health issues from meds such as Lyrica that have no research as far as long term health conditions. I found a natural remedy called Headache Free and I'm giving it a try.....good luck because I know exactly how debilitative these symptoms are

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