neurasthenia

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neurasthenia

 [noor″as-the´ne-ah]
a virtually obsolete term formerly used to describe a vague disorder marked by chronic abnormal fatigability, moderate depression, inability to concentrate, loss of appetite, insomnia, and other symptoms. Popularly called nervous prostration. adj., adj neurasthen´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă),
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

neurasthenia

(no͝or′əs-thē′nē-ə, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A group of symptoms, including chronic physical and mental fatigue, weakness, and generalized aches and pains, formerly thought to result from exhaustion of the nervous system and now usually considered a psychological disorder. The term is no longer in clinical use in many parts of the world.

neu′ras·then′ic (-thĕn′ĭk) adj. & n.
neu′ras·then′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neurasthenia

Medical history
A condition described in the late 1800s as being uniquely American, believed to most commonly affect those who performed cerebral work (e.g., physicians, lawyers and inventors), which is now known as stress. Reported findings included a loss of interest in mental labour and heart disturbances. Neurasthenia was viewed as a reflection of the natural superiority of the American culture and a product of the progress and refinement of modern civilisation; treatments included cold water cures, diets, exercise, arsenic and many others.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

neurasthenia

Psychology Effort syndrome A nonspecific finding, often associated with depression or anxiety disorders, characterized by fatigue, and inability to function Accompaniments Autonomic changes–eg, tachycardia, sighing, blushing, dysdiaphoresis; Pts may believe neurasthenia is organic, not psychological
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă)
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

neurasthenia

A state of constant fatigue, loss of motivation and energy and often insomnia and muscle aches associated with general and persistent unhappiness. In the present state of knowledge, and in the absence of any evidence of a cause, the state described as neurasthenia is considered not to be of organic origin and, in particular, to have nothing to do with nerve function.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Neurasthenia

A term coined in the late nineteenth century to refer to a condition of chronic mental and physical weakness and fatigue. Some researchers regard MCS as a twentieth-century version of neurasthenia.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

neur·as·the·ni·a

(nūr'as-thē'nē-ă)
An ill-defined condition, commonly accompanying or following depression, characterized by vague fatigue believed to be brought on by psychological factors.
[neur- + G. astheneia, weakness]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012