cerebral dominance


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Related to cerebral dominance: dominant hemisphere

ce·re·bral dom·i·nance

the fact that one hemisphere is dominant over the other and will thereby exercise greater influence over certain functions; the left cerebral hemisphere is usually dominant in the control of speech, language and analytic processing, and mathematics, whereas the right hemisphere (usually nondominant) processes spatial concepts and language as related to certain types of visual images; handedness (right-handed people have left cerebral dominance) is considered a general example of cerebral dominance.

cerebral dominance

the specialization of each of the two cerebral hemispheres in the integration and control of different functions. In 90% of the population, the left cerebral hemisphere specializes in or dominates the ability to speak and write and the capacity to understand spoken and written words. The areas that control these activities are situated in the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes of the left hemisphere. In the other 10% of the population, either the right hemisphere or both hemispheres dominate the speech and writing abilities. The right cerebral hemisphere dominates the integration of certain sounds other than those associated with speaking, such as sounds of coughing, laughter, crying, and melodies. The right cerebral hemisphere perceives tactile stimuli and visual spatial relationships better than the left cerebral hemisphere does. See also Brodmann's areas.

ce·re·bral dom·i·nance

(ser'ĕ-brăl dom'i-năns)
The fact that one hemisphere is dominant over the other and exercises greater influence over certain functions; the left cerebral hemisphere is usually dominant in the controlof speech, language and analytic processing, and mathematics, whereas the right hemisphere (usually nondominant) processes spatial concepts and language as related to certain types of visual images; handedness (right-handed people have left cerebral dominance) is considered a general example of cerebral dominance.

cerebral dominance

The control of speech and handedness by one hemisphere of the brain. In 90% to 95% of human beings, the left cerebral hemisphere is functionally dominant; as a result most people are right-handed. A lesion (such as a stroke or tumor) to the left cerebral hemisphere of such people will produce aphasia and right-sided paralysis. Aphasia rarely occurs in right-handed people from a right cerebral lesion. In 60% of left-handed people with aphasia from a cerebral lesion, the left side is affected. In some left-handed patients, it is possible that language function is controlled partially by both the left and right cerebal hemispheres.
See: stroke
See also: dominance
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased mixed- and left-handedness are expected in children with specific disorders of speech and literacy, when the latter are associated with absence of typical cerebral dominance (Orton, 1937).
Effects of cerebral dominance on college-level achievement.
Hemispheric chemical dominance/tridosha states had no correlation with cerebral dominance detected by handedness/dichotic listening test [8].
To determine if there is an association between sidedness of cell phone use and auditory or language hemispheric dominance, the Henry Ford team developed a online survey using modifications of the Edinburgh Handedness protocol, a tool used for more than 40 years to assess handedness and predict cerebral dominance.