cerebellopontine angle tumor

vestibular schwannoma

a benign but life-threatening tumor arising from Schwann cells, usually of the vestibular division of the eighth cranial nerve in early stage; produces hearing loss, tinnitus, and vestibular disturbances and in late stages cerebellar, brainstem, and other cranial nerve signs and increased intracranial pressure.

cerebellopontine angle tumor

Acoustic neuroma, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: The most common cerebellopontine angle tumor is acoustic neuroma which is followed by meningioma, epidermoid and arachnoid cyst.
Finally, brain MRI performed one year later demonstrated interval resection of the right cerebellopontine angle tumor without evidence of residual tumor (Figure 3(d)).
Early complications and symptoms of cerebellopontine angle tumor surgery: a prospective analysis.
We also envision the potential use of surgical robotics in several other sites: the cervical esophagus (e.g., for endoscopic Zenker's diverticulectomy and diverticulostomy), the neck (e.g., for endoscopic and robot-assisted dissection, thyroidectomy, and parathyroidectomy), the lateral skull base via minimally invasive entry ports (e.g., for paraganglioma resection and V2 and V3 schwannoma excision), the anterior skull base (e.g., for pituitary surgery and chordoma excision), and the temporal bone (e.g., for mastoidectomy, stapes surgery, cerebellopontine angle tumor resection, and other otologic procedures).
The differential diagnosis includes glomus jugular tumors, cerebellopontine angle tumor, malignant melanoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, lymphoma, and plasma cell granuloma.
The authors found six cases reported to have malignant degeneration after radiation therapy for a cerebellopontine angle tumor.
Positional nystagmus has been reported in patients with a cerebellopontine angle tumor, Arnold-Chiari malformation, multiple sclerosis, lateral medullary infarction, or brainstem contusion.
Endoscopic assistance in surgery of cerebellopontine angle tumors. Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko 2014; 78: 42-9.
These lesions account for 8 to 10% of all intracranial tumors and more than 90% of all cerebellopontine angle tumors. (1) Although they are benign, acoustic neuromas can cause considerable morbidity if left untreated because of their location in the internal auditory canal and cerebellopontine angle.
It accounts for 8 10% of all primary intracranial tumours and 80% of Cerebellopontine angle tumours.2 Meningioma constitutes 5 10% of Cerebellopontine angle tumors with rare tumours constituting only a small percentage out of which epidermoid cyst is the most frequent.