cerebellar

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Related to cerebellar dysfunction: cerebellar syndrome, Cerebellar ataxia

cerebellar

 [ser″ĕ-bel´er]
pertaining to the cerebellum.

cer·e·bel·lar

(ser'e-bel'ar),
Relating to the cerebellum.

cerebellar

/cer·e·bel·lar/ (ser″ĕ-bel´ar) pertaining to the cerebellum.

cerebellar

[ser′əbel′ər]
Etymology: L, cerebellum, small brain
pertaining to the cerebellum.

cer·e·bel·lar

(ser-ĕ-bel'ăr)
Relating to the cerebellum.

Cerebellar

Involving the part of the brain (cerebellum), which controls walking, balance, and coordination.

cerebellar

pertaining to the cerebellum.

cerebellar abiotrophy
occurs in cattle, pigs and dogs. Affected young are normal at birth but at an early age ataxia and signs of cerebellar dysfunction appear, often progressing to complete immobilization. Cerebral function is usually normal. An inherited basis is suspected. In Kerry blue terriers, it is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Called also cerebellar neuronal abiotrophy.
cerebellar agenesis
absence of the cerebellum due to its non-appearance in the embryo.
cerebellar aplasia
see cerebellar atrophy (below).
cerebellar ataxia
the incoordination of gait characterized by exaggerated movements. There is no paresis. There is exaggerated strength and distance of movement—hypermetria. Caused usually by damage to the cerebellum or to the spinocerebellar tracts. May be congenital due to cerebellar atrophy or acquired due to inflammation or malacia of the cerebellum.
cerebellar atrophy
degeneration and loss of cells—Purkinje and granular cells of the cerebellum. Present at birth or soon after, is congenital in sheep, cattle, Arab horses, dogs and cats. Some of the diseases are inherited, some are known to be due to virus infection in utero, e.g. bovine virus diarrhea, feline panleukopenia. Some are in fact abiotrophies, premature aging of tissues. In the latter the animals are normal at birth but develop classical signs later. Segmental atrophy occurs in pigs but is asymptomatic.
cerebellar coning
see cerebellar lipping (below), brain herniation.
cerebellar cortex
the superficial gray matter of the cerebellum.
cerebellar dysfunction
see cerebellar ataxia (above).
cerebellar dysmelinogenesis
recorded in Chow Chow dogs; characterized by congenital head tremor.
feline cerebellar ataxia
see feline panleukopenia.
cerebellar hypomyelinogenesis
abnormally reduced myelination in the cerebellum; characterized clinically by severe neonatal tremor.
cerebellar hypoplasia
deficiency of cells of the cerebellum, the degree and distribution of which is variable. See cerebellar atrophy (above).
inherited cerebellar defects
includes cerebellar abiotrophy, atrophy, agenesis, hypoplasia, neuraxonal dystrophy.
cerebellar lipping
caused by diffuse cerebral edema. The vermis of the cerebellum protrudes through the foramen magnum and lies like a tongue over the medulla.
cerebellar neuronal abiotrophy
see cerebellar abiotrophy (above).
cerebellar neuraxonal dystrophy
reported in collie sheepdogs. The lesion is limited to axons and there are no lesions in the cerebellar folial neurons.
cerebellar syndrome
see cerebellar ataxia (above).

Patient discussion about cerebellar

Q. can you recover after a cerebellar stroke?

A. You can recover after a cerebellar stroke but the process takes time and rehabilitation. With the right kind of rehab people reach great results, supposing of course the initial injury allows it.

More discussions about cerebellar
References in periodicals archive ?
Brain stem and cerebellar dysfunction with Legionnaires' disease.
Presentation usually entails signs and symptoms of cerebellar dysfunction and raised intracranial pressure.
Cerebellar dysfunction, including ataxia and opsoclonus, presented as the initial symptom before the development of LE in some cases.
1,3) The rarer clinical presentations described in literature are myeloradiculopathy, myelopathy, cerebellar dysfunction, (4) transverse myelitis, (5) cerebrovascular accident, cerebral venous thrombosis, cerebral arteritis, subarachnoid haemorrhage, optic neuritis, mononeuritis multiplex, peripheral nerve palsy, psychosis, suicidal behaviour, encephalitis, and cerebellitis.
141 An SA study found the prevalence of neurological complications to be 59%, the most common being HIV encephalopathy and long-tract motor signs; however, no cases of cerebellar dysfunction were documented in that study.
This causes several toxic reactions like mucositis, diarrhea, neutropenia, cerebellar ataxia, cerebellar dysfunction, and can even be fatal at the very first dose of 5-FU, with a mortality rate of about 0,5%.
More recently, cerebellar dysfunction is also being recognized as involved in schizophrenia and autism (O'Halloran et al.
Cerebellar dysfunction may occur in association with exposure to a wide variety of toxins including heavy metals (such as mercury, lead, thallium, and manganese), drugs and solvents.
The major clinical features of cerebral toxoplasmosis are headache, hemiparesis, speech disturbances, cerebellar dysfunction and cranial nerve palsies.
Immune activation during cerebellar dysfunction following Plasmodium falciparum malaria.
2003), which may, to some extent, be responsible for age-related cerebellar dysfunction.

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