cereal

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cereal

(sēr′ē-ăl) [L. cerealis, of grain]
An edible seed or grain, containing approximately 70% to 80% carbohydrate by weight and 8% to 15% protein. Many cereals also provide significant dietary fiber. Common cereals include barley, oats, rice, and wheat.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

cereal

any member of the plant family Gramineae which produces edible fruits, e.g. rice, wheat, maize, oats and barley.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"Dubai sometimes can feel very isolating and we can get lonely, but you can always find comfort in cereal.
Opt for cereal with at least two, and ideally at least five, grammes of fibre per serving.
consumers who report they are eating less cereal, 33 percent indicate they are looking for breakfast items with more protein; however, only 4 percent of breakfast cereals launched in North America during the 12 months ending in September 2014 were marketed as high in protein.
These are the highest-ranked cereals based on DietDetective.com's 19 criteria:
What to do: Beware of dense cereals. Don't just check a cereal's calories per serving.
"Regardless of whether they have children in their homes, Hispanic households are more likely than non-Hispanic households to have consumed 21 or more servings of cold breakfast cereal in the last 30 days," the report says.
RumChata has embraced its cereal taste and in October introduced a line of cereal-bowl shot glasses.
Total cereal cultivation area in the EU27 in 2013 is expected to amount to 56.9 million hectares, an increase of 0.2% over 2012.
All starch-coated cereals had a lower milk absorption value than the uncoated and glucose-coated controls.
"In 2012, General Mills reached a multiyear reformulation milestone across its portfolio of Big G cereals to ensure that every Big G cereal now has more whole grain than any other single ingredient," she says.
They found that 12 out of 14 cereals marketed at children had high levels of sugar.
said the majority of top selling cereals were laden with sugar -especially those targeted at children.