cephalosporin C

ceph·a·lo·spo·rin C

an antibiotic with activity due to the 7-aminocephalosporanic acid portion of the cephalosporanic acid molecule; it is effective against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, but is less potent than cephalosporin N. Addition of side chains produced semisynthetic broad spectrum antibiotics with greater antibacterial activity than that of cephalosporin C; the antibiotic activity is due to interference with bacterial cell-wall synthesis.

ceph·a·lo·spo·rin C

(sefă-lō-spōrin)
Antibiotic effective against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1955-56) had isolated cephalosporin C, cephalosporin P and penicillin N from culture of C.
The effect of the incubation time on the cephalosporin C production by Acremonium chrysogenum was determined by carrying out fermentation experiments for different time intervals ranging from 4-8 days.
Cephalosporin C production by immobilized Cephalosporium acremonium cells in a repeated batch tower bioreactor.
Influence of pH regulation and nutrient content on cephalosporin C production in solid-state fermentation by Acremonium chrysogenum C10.
Cephalosporin C (CPC) was the second [beta]-lactam antibiotics to be discovered after penicillin from the fungus Cephalosporium acremonium by Giuseppe Brotzu (1,2).
According to the diversity in substrate specificity, CAs can be divided into two classes, the cephalosporin C (CPC) acylase and the glutaryl-7-aminocephalosporanic acid (GL-7-ACA) acylase classes.
The types of cephalosporin acylase are: type 1 is true cephalosporin C acylase.
The natural of cephalosporin C acylase catalyzed the CPC to 7-ACA directly in a very low efficiency (14,15,16), significant substrate inhibition (14), and product inhibition (14).
chrysogenum (mold) cells for Cephalosporin C production.
Cephalosporins are usually produced semi synthetically from Cephalosporin C (CPC), an important [beta]-lactam group of antibiotic, which is effective against gram positive and gram-negative bacteria and is exclusively produced by a mold Acremonium chrysogenum.
The reactivation (seed) medium was used for inoculm preparation to inoculate production media for production of cephalosporin C by free as well as immobilized cells [10].
The effect of several parameters, such as the effect of alginate concentration, the effect of cation, and its concentration on cephalosporin C production and bead stability were studied.