cephalhematoma


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cephalhematoma

 [sef″al-he″mah-to´mah]
a localized effusion of blood beneath the periosteum of the skull of a newborn, due to disruption of the vessels during birth. Cephalhematoma, in contrast to caput succedaneum, does not cross cranial suture lines. It is firmer to the touch than an edematous area: it feels like a water-filled balloon. Cephalhematoma usually appears on the second or third day after birth and disappears within weeks or months.

ceph·al·he·ma·to·ma

(sef'ăl-hē'mă-tō'mă),
A collection of blood beneath the periosteum, frequently seen in a newborn as a result of birth trauma; contrasted with caput succedaneum, in which the effusion overlies the periosteum and consists of serum.
Synonym(s): cephalohematoma
[cephal- + G. haima, blood, + -ōma, tumor]

cephalhematoma

/ceph·al·he·ma·to·ma/ (-he″mah-to´mah) a subperiosteal hemorrhage limited to the surface of one cranial bone; a usually benign condition seen in the newborn as a result of bone trauma.

cephalhematoma

[sef′əlhē′mətō′mə, -hem′ətō′mə]
swelling caused by subcutaneous bleeding and accumulation of blood. It may begin to form in the scalp of a fetus during labor and enlarge slowly in the first few days after birth. It is usually a result of trauma, often caused by forceps. Large cephalhematomas may become infected, require surgical drainage, and take several months to resolve. Also called cephalhaematoma. Compare caput succedaneum, molding.
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Cephalhematoma

cephalhematoma

a localized effusion of blood beneath the periosteum of the skull of the newborn, due to disruption of the vessels during parturition.
References in periodicals archive ?
n=24) (n=36) 1 Rh incompatibility 5 4 2 ABO incompatibility 9 10 3 Rh and ABO incompatibility 2 4 4 G6PD deficiency 0 2 5 Cephalhematoma 0 2 6 Unidentified 8 9 Table 6.
1 just for caput succedaneum, cephalhematoma, and chignon.
TABLE 3 Vacuum extraction can injure the fetus DIRECT INJURY Cephalhematoma Intracranial hemorrhage (parenchymal, subdural, intraventricular, subarachnoid) Nerve injury Scalp laceration, abrasion, ecchymoses, necrosis Skull fracture Subgaleal hemorrhage INDIRECT INJURY Anemia, hyperbilirubinemia Brachial plexus injury Scalp infection or abscess SOURCE: O'Grady et al (31) TABLE 4 Perform these predelivery checks before applying traction Is anesthesia adequate?
He found 108 injuries other than cephalhematoma, an incidence of one birth injury for every 143 deliveries.
Babies with craniofacial abnormalities (Such as cleft palate, cleft lip, micrognathia, caput succedaneum, cephalhematoma, hydrocephalous, etc.
Failure to recognize the presence of risk factors for hyperbilirubinemia, which include jaundice in the first 24 hours, visible jaundice before discharge, family history of a sibling who was jaundiced, gestation of 35-38 weeks, exclusive breast-feeding, East Asian race, bruising, cephalhematoma, maternal age greater than 25 years, and male gender.
Neonatal complications in both groups including low Apgar score, scalp and facial injuries, cephalhematoma, birth asphyxia, neonatal sepsis, were noted.