cephalhematoma


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cephalhematoma

 [sef″al-he″mah-to´mah]
a localized effusion of blood beneath the periosteum of the skull of a newborn, due to disruption of the vessels during birth. Cephalhematoma, in contrast to caput succedaneum, does not cross cranial suture lines. It is firmer to the touch than an edematous area: it feels like a water-filled balloon. Cephalhematoma usually appears on the second or third day after birth and disappears within weeks or months.

ceph·al·he·ma·to·ma

(sef'ăl-hē'mă-tō'mă),
A collection of blood beneath the periosteum, frequently seen in a newborn as a result of birth trauma; contrasted with caput succedaneum, in which the effusion overlies the periosteum and consists of serum.
Synonym(s): cephalohematoma
[cephal- + G. haima, blood, + -ōma, tumor]
References in periodicals archive ?
(n=24) (n=36) 1 Rh incompatibility 5 4 2 ABO incompatibility 9 10 3 Rh and ABO incompatibility 2 4 4 G6PD deficiency 0 2 5 Cephalhematoma 0 2 6 Unidentified 8 9 Table 6.
Now that there is a separate subgaleal hemorrhage code, physicians can use 767.1 just for caput succedaneum, cephalhematoma, and chignon.
224 ABO incompatibility 108 Rh Incompatibility 31 G6PD deficiency 35 Sepsis 36 Cephalhematoma 15 Intrauterine infection 7 Breast Milk jaundice 6 Hypothyroidism 4 Idiopathic 54 Note: Table made from bar graph.
TABLE 3 Vacuum extraction can injure the fetus DIRECT INJURY Cephalhematoma Intracranial hemorrhage (parenchymal, subdural, intraventricular, subarachnoid) Nerve injury Scalp laceration, abrasion, ecchymoses, necrosis Skull fracture Subgaleal hemorrhage INDIRECT INJURY Anemia, hyperbilirubinemia Brachial plexus injury Scalp infection or abscess SOURCE: O'Grady et al (31) TABLE 4 Perform these predelivery checks before applying traction Is anesthesia adequate?
"You can look at risk factors such as prematurity, breast-feeding, early discharge, cephalhematoma, ABO incompatibility, previous child with jaundice, and so on," Dr.
The longer the duration of vacuum extraction, the greater the likelihood that the baby will develop a cephalhematoma. Vacuum extractions that last longer than 5 minutes from application to delivery cause cephalhematomas in 28% of neonates.
He found 108 injuries other than cephalhematoma, an incidence of one birth injury for every 143 deliveries.
Babies with craniofacial abnormalities (Such as cleft palate, cleft lip, micrognathia, caput succedaneum, cephalhematoma, hydrocephalous, etc.) were excluded.