centromere


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centromere

 [sen´tro-mēr]
the clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division. adj., adj centromer´ic.
 Position of the centromere in A, metacentric, B, submetacentric, C, acrocentric, and D, telocentric chromosomes. From Dorland's, 2000.

cen·tro·mere

(sen'trō-mēr),
1. The nonstaining primary constriction of a chromosome that is the point of attachment of the spindle fiber; provides the mechanism of chromosome movement during cell division; the centromere divides the chromosome into two arms, and its position is constant for a specific chromosome: near one end (acrocentric), near the center (metacentric), or between (submetacentric).
[centro- + G. meros, part]

centromere

/cen·tro·mere/ (-mēr) the clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.centromer´ic
Enlarge picture
Position of the centromere in (A) metacentric; (B) submetacentric; (C) acrocentric; and (D) telocentric chromosomes.

centromere

(sĕn′trə-mîr′)
n.
The most condensed and constricted region of a chromosome, to which the spindle fiber is attached during mitosis.

cen′tro·mer′ic (-mĕr′ĭk, -mîr′-) adj.

centromere (cen)

[sen′trəmir]
Etymology: Gk, kentron + meros, part
the constricted region of a chromosome that joins the two chromatids to each other and attaches to spindle fibers in mitosis and meiosis. During cell division the centromeres split longitudinally, half going to each of the new daughter chromosomes. The position of the centromere is constant for a specific chromosome and is identified as acrocentric, metacentric, submetacentric, or telocentric. Also called kinetochore, kinomere, primary constriction. centromeric, adj.

centromere

(1) An obsolete term for the neck of the sprematozoon. 
(2) Centromere; centromerus [NH3].

cen·tro·mere

(sen'trō-mēr)
The nonstaining primary constriction of a chromosome; the centromere divides the chromosome into two arms and its position is constant for a specific chromosome: near one end (acrocentric), near the center (metacentric), or between (submetacentric).
[centro- + G. meros, part]

centromere

The constriction in a chromosome at which the two identical halves (chromatids) of the newly longitudinally-divided chromosome are joined, and at which the chromosome attaches to the spindle fibre during division (mitosis). The centromere contains no genes.

centromere

a structure occurring at one point along the length of a CHROMOSOME, often visible under the light microscope as a bump or a constriction whose location can help to identify the chromosome. The centromere contains a complex system of fibres called the kinetochore which becomes duplicated when the chromosomes divide into CHROMATIDS. The kinetochore attaches to SPINDLE microtubules during nuclear division. Damaged chromosomes without centromeres (ACENTRIC CHROMOSOMES) fail to move normally during nuclear division.

Centromere

The centromere is the constricted region of a chromosome. It performs certain functions during cell division.

centromere

primary constriction of a chromosome dividing it into two arms

centromere

the clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sensing centromere tension: Aurora B and the regulation of kinetochore function.
positioning of yield enhancing genes near the centromere provide an
By using C-banding constitutive heterochromatin regions were observed on the centromeres of several chromosomes in all species.
This species is a model organism in cell biology because its chromosome replication and the regulation of its centromere are similar to that of humans.
Furthermore, in chromosomes 1, 2, 7, and 8, positive C-banding staining in the centromere was also observed (Figs.
Some authors stated that holokinetic chromosomes represent a primitive character, while those having localized centromeres derived from them (Kiuta 1970, Sybenga 1981, 1992).
However, there are other possibilities, including both breaks occurring within the centromere in telocentrics (John & Freeman 1976).
JONES & PASAKINSKIENE (2005) include them in the group of selfish genic elements with transposons and centromere (specially the kinetocore ones), which present their own mechanisms of perpetuation and may cause conflicts with the host's genomes.
Already the horse genome has helped to answer at least one fundamental question in biology: What is needed for proper centromere function?
1] plants especially during premeiotic stages is further known to enhance crossing over in proximal region adjacent to the centromere resulting in further enhancing the genetic variability in [F.