centromere


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centromere

 [sen´tro-mēr]
the clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division. adj., adj centromer´ic.
 Position of the centromere in A, metacentric, B, submetacentric, C, acrocentric, and D, telocentric chromosomes. From Dorland's, 2000.

cen·tro·mere

(sen'trō-mēr),
1. The nonstaining primary constriction of a chromosome that is the point of attachment of the spindle fiber; provides the mechanism of chromosome movement during cell division; the centromere divides the chromosome into two arms, and its position is constant for a specific chromosome: near one end (acrocentric), near the center (metacentric), or between (submetacentric).
[centro- + G. meros, part]

centromere

/cen·tro·mere/ (-mēr) the clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.centromer´ic
Enlarge picture
Position of the centromere in (A) metacentric; (B) submetacentric; (C) acrocentric; and (D) telocentric chromosomes.

centromere

(sĕn′trə-mîr′)
n.
The most condensed and constricted region of a chromosome, to which the spindle fiber is attached during mitosis.

cen′tro·mer′ic (-mĕr′ĭk, -mîr′-) adj.

centromere (cen)

[sen′trəmir]
Etymology: Gk, kentron + meros, part
the constricted region of a chromosome that joins the two chromatids to each other and attaches to spindle fibers in mitosis and meiosis. During cell division the centromeres split longitudinally, half going to each of the new daughter chromosomes. The position of the centromere is constant for a specific chromosome and is identified as acrocentric, metacentric, submetacentric, or telocentric. Also called kinetochore, kinomere, primary constriction. centromeric, adj.

centromere

(1) An obsolete term for the neck of the sprematozoon. 
(2) Centromere; centromerus [NH3].

cen·tro·mere

(sen'trō-mēr)
The nonstaining primary constriction of a chromosome; the centromere divides the chromosome into two arms and its position is constant for a specific chromosome: near one end (acrocentric), near the center (metacentric), or between (submetacentric).
[centro- + G. meros, part]

centromere

The constriction in a chromosome at which the two identical halves (chromatids) of the newly longitudinally-divided chromosome are joined, and at which the chromosome attaches to the spindle fibre during division (mitosis). The centromere contains no genes.

centromere

a structure occurring at one point along the length of a CHROMOSOME, often visible under the light microscope as a bump or a constriction whose location can help to identify the chromosome. The centromere contains a complex system of fibres called the kinetochore which becomes duplicated when the chromosomes divide into CHROMATIDS. The kinetochore attaches to SPINDLE microtubules during nuclear division. Damaged chromosomes without centromeres (ACENTRIC CHROMOSOMES) fail to move normally during nuclear division.

Centromere

The centromere is the constricted region of a chromosome. It performs certain functions during cell division.

centromere

primary constriction of a chromosome dividing it into two arms

centromere

the clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.
References in periodicals archive ?
Considering the pesticide mixture used at the RF, the higher frequency of cells with chromosome breaks and asynchronic centromere segregation in animals from this area could result from the action of both clastogenic and aneugenic (spindle poison) agents.
In a minor percentage of nuclei, more than 2 signals were observed, which is the result of fragmentation of the centromere signal and does not reflect an aberration.
Chromosomal regions near the centromere carry major genes that
Atotal of 10 metaphases per species with similar degree of condensation, without overlappings and evident centromeres were measured and classified according to the specifications of Levan et al.
The CEP17 reference assay targets a highly conserved region, which is present at 1 copy per haploid genome and is close to the repeat region near the centromere of chromosome 17, which is frequently targeted in FISH analysis.
The way in which a vital protein is loaded by others into the centromere, the part of the chromosome that plays a significant role in cell division, has been identified by biologists.
3+] directly suppresses centromere accumulation of C/ EBP [ beta] and/or interferes with the acquisition of C/ EBP [ beta ] - DNA-binding activity.
X and Y centromere FISH probes (AneuVysion, Abbott Molecular) were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy (Olympus, Center Valley, Pennsylvania).
The ANA antigen and AIH antibodies will react against ribonucleoprotein, centromere, and ribonucleoprotein complexes, (6) producing mostly a homogenous pattern in type 1 AIH.
Normal human chromosomes are linear in structure consisting of two "arms" (designated "p" and "q") that flank a single active centromere.
In Anaphase, Any chromosome fragment or whole chromosomes which lack a centromere may not be integrated in the nucleus, because of the lack of an indispensable element for orientation in the spindle apparatus.