centripetal acceleration


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Related to centripetal acceleration: centrifugal force

centripetal acceleration

Rate of change in velocity per unit of time while on a circular or curved course. Synonym: central acceleration
See also: acceleration
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The third example uses SI units for the velocity in meters per second (78b) of an aircraft flying in a circular path of radius (78a) in meters, using time in seconds in the centripetal acceleration (78c) that is small compared with that of gravity:
In such case, the arch bridge is affected by notable dynamic amplification in the medium range of speeds, namely, for 0.6 [less than or equal to] [??] [less than or equal to] 1.1, because of resonance issues, as well as in the high range of speeds, in which the effect of nonstandard forces of the moving system arising from Coriolis acceleration and centripetal acceleration becomes quite relevant.
* section A1 undergoes two centripetal accelerations that by integration will be spread all over the surface of A that will translate into forces of adhesion and cohesion
When you're at the top of the loop, gravity wants to yank you to the ground, but centripetal acceleration makes the train hug the track and inertia pushes you into your seat--even when you're upside down!
Parameter value Carrier frequency: [f.sub.1] = 10 GHz Intermediate frequency: f = 100 MHz Sample frequency: [f.sub.s] = 10 GHz EBPSK modulation parameters: N = 7K = 2 False alarm probability: [P.sub.fa] = [10.sup.-6] Target detection probability: [P.sub.d] = 0.9 The number of pulses: N = 10 Pulse width: T = 200 [micro]s Simulated Orbit 1: Initial velocity: 450 m/s; accelerated velocity: 40 m/[s.sup.2] Simulated Orbit 2: Initial velocity: 450 m/s; centripetal acceleration: 20 m/[s.sup.2]
Appendix 1 Derivation of Centripetal Acceleration under relativistic conditions
That is, the centripetal acceleration at the surface of a structure is:
The centripetal acceleration relation for circular orbits [v.sub.o](r) = [square root of rg(r)] gives a "universal rotation-speed curve"
At this stage, Clark calculated that their bodies undergo centripetal accelerations reaching 10 g - a force equivalent to 10 times the gravitational pull of Earth.
At the high centripetal accelerations present in a hydrocyclone (700m/[S.sup.2]), the mean "radial settling velocity" of fibers is about 7mm/s.