Lesion

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lesion

 [le´zhun]
any pathological or traumatic discontinuity of tissue or loss of function of a part. Lesion is a broad term, including wounds, sores, ulcers, tumors, cataracts, and any other tissue damage. They range from the skin sores associated with eczema to the changes in lung tissue that occur in tuberculosis.
Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesion a microscopic spherical hyaline mass surrounded by capillaries, found in the kidney glomerulus in the nodular form of intercapillary glomerulosclerosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

le·sion

(lē'zhŭn),
1. A wound or injury.
2. A pathologic change in the tissues.
3. One of the individual points or patches of a multifocal disease.
[L. laedo, pp. laesus, to injure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lesion

(lē′zhən)
n.
Any of various pathological or traumatic changes in a bodily organ or tissue, including tumors, ulcers, sores, and wounds.
tr.v. le·sioned, le·sioning, le·sions
To cause a lesion to form on or in.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

lesion

(1) Any pathological or traumatic discontinuity of tissue or loss of function of a part; a wounded or damaged area; an anatomic or functional tissue defect; an area of abnormal tissue change.
 
(2) A nebulous, nonspecific term used by a doctor when discussing a lump or bump with a patient.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

lesion

 Medtalk
1. A wounded or damaged area; an anatomic or functional tissue defect; an area of abnormal tissue change.
2. A nebulous nonspecific term used by a physician when discussing a lump or bump with a Pt. See Mass.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

le·sion

(lē'zhŭn)
1. A wound or injury.
2. A pathologic change in the tissues.
3. One of the individual points or patches of a multifocal disease.
[L. laedo, pp. laesus, to injure]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lesion

A useful and widely used medical term meaning any injury, wound, infection, or any structural or other form of abnormality anywhere in the body. Doctors would be at a loss without this term, but it is commonly wrongly regarded by lay people as implying some specific condition such as an adhesion. The word is derived from the Latin laesio , an attack or injury.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

lesion

a localized area of diseased tissue.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Lesion

Any visible, local abnormality of the tissues of the skin, such as a wound, sore, rash, or boil.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

lesion

Localized, pathological change in a tissue due to injury or disease.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

le·sion

(lē'zhŭn)
1. Wound or injury.
2. Pathologic change in tissues.
3. One of the individual points or patches of a multifocal disease.
[L. laedo, pp. laesus, to injure]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(82-98) In this study, pulmonologists' underestimation of the sensitivity of sputum cytology, even for large central lesions with a high probability of malignancy, may have contributed to their avoidance of this test.
Most pulmonary sclerosing hemangiomas are solitary and are located in the peripheral zone of the lung, although multiple unilateral or bilateral lesions and central lesions have been reported.
DISCUSSION As we diagnosed mostly central lesions, so it is clear that fibreoptic bronchoscopy is a diagnostic tool mostly for central lesions.
In our study increased diagnosis of central lesions by fibreoptic bronchoscopy was statistically significant.
For central lesions that are peribronchial, transbronchial needle aspirations are performed.
Adipose tissue is also frequently present, especially in central lesions. The epithelium is thought to be entrapped reactive epithelium.
Its more recent phylogenetic appearance could be the origin of a higher sensitivity of the abductor neurons to central lesions and explain bilateral central abductor paralysis (or Gerhardt's syndrome).
On initial CT scan, a total of 29 subjects were found to have lung cancer (27 peripheral lesions and 2 central lesions), for a total prevalence of 2.9%.
In our study, the caloric response reduced; it is currently accepted that caloric testing remains normal in central lesions (10).
Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur almost anywhere, including the retroperitoneum, but a more peripheral location on the extremities is more common in the solitary (non-von Recklinghausen disease) form, whereas central lesions on the trunk or head and neck predominate in neurofibromatosis.

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