central dogma of molecular biology


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central dogma of molecular biology

The outdated principle which states that proteins are made from RNA, which in turn is made from DNA. Other permutations are found in nature; e.g., RNA viruses use a reverse transcriptase to make complementary DNA.
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Central dogma of molecular biology. Nature, 227, 561-563.
Rather, it offers historical accounts, often first-person descriptions, of many of the key discoveries relating to the central dogma of molecular biology as initially expounded by Francis Crick in 1958: "DNA makes RNA makes protein." This book is of potential interest for aficionados of the history of science, particularly relating to molecular biology, and selected chapters might be of value to scientists in training, or early in their career.
This book is a compilation of articles on significant events in the history of biochemistry, which were published in the journal "Trends in Biochemical Sciences." Editor Witkowski has selected articles that present an insider's view of discoveries that are now seen as landmark achievements, and that relate to the central dogma of molecular biology, which is that DNA makes RNA makes protein, or, "once information has passed into protein it cannot get out again." The book begins with Albrecht Kossel and the discovery of histones, and ranges through Schrodinger and the origins of molecular biology, the double helix, DNA replication, protein synthesis, genetic code, tRNA, mRNA, early ribosome research, peptidyl transfer, and finally to the advent of rapid DNA sequencing.
After an introduction to some of these key molecules and to the central dogma of molecular biology, we can begin to see the outlines of how such molecules can accomplish the tasks required of simple and then more complex life forms.

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