central dogma


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cen·tral dog·ma

the proposition that while genetic information is transferred from parent to offspring via DNA duplication, within the cell, genetic information is transferred from DNA to mRNA (transcription) and then to protein (translation); proposed by Francis Crick.
The central dogma is the main thesis of molecular inheritance. In its simplest form, it states that DNA makes RNA, which makes protein; it is the pedagogical tenet that translation of a protein invariably follows a chain of molecular command, where DNA acts as the template for both its own replication and for the transcription to RNA—and, with subsequent maturation, to mRNA, which then serves as a template for translation into a protein

central dogma

Molecular biology The pedagogical tenet that translation of a protein invariably follows a chain of molecular command, where DNA acts as the template for both its own replication and for the transcription to RNA–and with subsequent maturation, to mRNA, which then serves as a template for translation into a protein. See DNA, Nucleic acid, Protein, Reverse transcription, RNA, RNA polymerase. Cf Prion.

central dogma

The proposition by Francis Crick (1916–) that, in genetics, the only possible progression was from DNA to RNA to protein. Embarrassingly, the discovery that retroviruses used RNA to make DNA demonstrated the riskiness of pronouncing dogmas in science.

central dogma

the hypothesis (based on WEISMANNISM) that genetical information flows only in one direction, from DNA to RNA to PROTEIN, and not in the opposite direction. Thus, in general, changes to protein structures produced by external forces are not inherited. See SOMATIC MUTATION. The hypothesis has, however, been modified to account for the activity of the enzyme REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE, which transfers information ‘backwards’ from RNA to DNA.
References in periodicals archive ?
The encoding/decoding processes of the algorithm are based on the central dogma of the molecular biology, and the processes are similar to the DNA transcription, splicing and RNA translation of the real organisms.
A central dogma of 20th-century education was that development and plasticity were reserved for children, and that the human brain changed little after childhood.
This is the first step in the so-called central dogma of biology: DNA begets RNA begets protein.
For here is a central dogma of revisionism: we learn more from members of other religions than they do from us.
In his provocative paper, Unraveling the DNA Myth: The Spurious Foundation of Genetic Engineering, Barry Commoner, senior scientist at the Center for Biology of Natural Systems at Queens College, stated that most of this brave new science is predicated upon a central dogma that is fundamentally and critically flawed.
He asserted that it revises a central dogma of molecular biology-that a protein molecule has one shape that predestines one biological function.
Biology's rules maybe full of exceptions, but a new discovery has uncovered a violation in a rule so fundamental that geneticists call it the central dogma.
They consider bioinformatics and mathematics; genetic codes, matrices, and symmetrical techniques; biological sequences, sequence alignment, and statistics; structures of DNA and knot theory; protein structures, geometry, and topology; biological networks and graph theory; biological systems, fractals, and systems biology; matrix genetics, Hadamard matrices, and algebraic biology; bioinformatics, denotional mathematics, and cognitive informatics; and evolutionary trends and the central dogma of informatics.
Crick tried to clarify his meaning in 1970, but the very label continued to signify to others that they should regard the central dogma erroneously as--well, dogma.
The foundation of the Company is based on the central dogma that (1) the inhibition of a unique target with in an essential metabolic pathway renders pathogenic microorganisms, to include but not limited to bacteria, yeast, fungi, and protists, non viable and/or non infective (pathogenic) and (2) these target and/or are found only in pathogenic microorganisms and not in mammals.
Rather, it offers historical accounts, often first-person descriptions, of many of the key discoveries relating to the central dogma of molecular biology as initially expounded by Francis Crick in 1958: "DNA makes RNA makes protein.

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