central cyanosis


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Related to central cyanosis: Peripheral cyanosis

cyanosis

 [si″ah-no´sis]
a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes due to excessive concentration of reduced hemoglobin in the blood. adj., adj cyanot´ic.
central cyanosis that due to arterial unsaturation, the aortic blood carrying reduced hemoglobin.
enterogenous cyanosis a syndrome due to absorption of nitrites and sulfides from the intestine, principally marked by methemoglobinemia and/or sulfhemoglobinemia associated with cyanosis, and accompanied by severe enteritis, abdominal pain, constipation or diarrhea, headache, dyspnea, dizziness, syncope, anemia, and, occasionally, digital clubbing and indicanuria.
peripheral cyanosis that due to an excessive amount of reduced hemoglobin in the venous blood as a result of extensive oxygen extraction at the capillary level.

central cyanosis

A bluish discoloration of the mucous membranes in the mouth, indicating hypoxemia and respiratory failure.

Treatment

If hypoxemia is confirmed by oximetry or arterial blood gas analysis, supplemental oxygen is provided.

Patient care

The patient's vital signs, blood gases, and sensorium should be monitored closely, as this sign may indicate hypoxemia accompanying impending respiratory failure.

Synonym: circumoral cyanosis
See also: cyanosis

cyanosis

a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes due to excessive concentration of reduced hemoglobin in the blood. Used wrongly by clinicians describing skin lesions in pigs where there is severe congestion of cutaneous vessels and some leakage of blood into perivascular tissues.

central cyanosis
that due to arterial unsaturation, the aortic blood carrying reduced hemoglobin.
enterogenous cyanosis
a syndrome due to absorption of nitrites and sulfides from the intestine, principally marked by methemoglobinemia and/or sulfhemoglobinemia associated with cyanosis.
peripheral cyanosis
that due to an excessive amount of reduced hemoglobin in the venous blood as a result of extensive oxygen extraction at the capillary level.
References in periodicals archive ?
Central cyanosis was evident and as such required some differential evaluation in the face of toxic ingestion.
Conclusively, history and physical examination findings should be evaluated carefully in patients with central cyanosis and nodular lesions in the lung.
Central cyanosis and skin lesion were seen in 8% and 20% in our study 37% and 4% seen in Vijayasekaran 5, et a114.
Hemoglobin electrophoresis examined for central cyanosis was found to be normal, capillary oxygen saturation was measured to be 88% (in room air) and did not increase by having the patient inhale oxygen.
If no cardiac casue can be found in a patient presenting with central cyanosis, AVM in the lung should absolutely be investigated.
Central cyanosis (blue lips/tongue) if no monitoring is available is even more serious
hypothermia, prolonged CRT, central cyanosis and respiratory distress.
Independent predictors of mortality were prematurity, admission weight < 2 kg, spent time more than 2 hours to reach the facility, and poor perfusion, central cyanosis (Table 5).
Neonates who became symptomatic within 6 hours of birth with one or more of the following nonspecific signs of sickness-tachypnea, chest retraction, grunting, lethargy, poor feeding, hypotonia, irritability, central cyanosis, etc.
5kg, cry -weak, in severe distress with central cyanosis and blue peripherals.
Under investigations Pulse oxymetre recording at the time of admission was recorded; a reading below 85%, which is associated with central cyanosis, was observed in 9.

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