censor

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censor

 [sen´ser]
a term used by Freud to refer to the mental faculty that guards the border between the unconscious and preconscious, preventing unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams. In Freud's later theory, the actions of the censor (displacement, condensation, symbolism, and repression) are considered defense mechanisms of the ego and superego.

cen·sor

(sen'sōr),
In psychoanalytic theory, the psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness unless they are so cloaked or disguised as to be unrecognizable.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]

censor

/cen·sor/ (sen´ser) the mental faculty that prevents unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams.

censor

(sĕn′sər)
n.
Psychology The agent in the unconscious that is responsible for censorship.
tr.v. cen·sored, cen·soring, cen·sors
To examine and expurgate.

cen′sor·a·ble adj.
cen·so′ri·al (sĕn-sôr′ē-əl) adj.

censor

Etymology: L, censere, to assess
1 a person who monitors or evaluates books, newspapers, plays, works of art, speech, or other means of expression in order to suppress certain kinds of information.
2 (in psychoanalysis) a psychic suppression that allows unconscious thoughts to rise to consciousness only if they are heavily disguised.

cen·sor

(sen'sŏr)
psychoanalytic theory The psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]

censor

A Freudian idea for the supposed agency that distorts or symbolizes repressed unpleasant material in the unconscious so that it need not be directly recognized either in dreams or in waking awareness. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.

censor

a member of a committee on ethics or for critical examination of a medical or other society.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given these criteria, consider the paternalistic interventions of coercive settlement counseling tactics, termination of representation threats, and censorious public disclosures presented in the instant environmental justice case study.
European scholars tend to be more balanced and less censorious.
Because of the censorious politics of Stalinist Russia in the 1930s, Meyerhold had abandoned Godunov, though he left copious notes.
It was merely a bonus that the king could employ the gardens to win favour with his latest mistress: with the arrival of the dour and censorious Madame de Maintenon, for instance, naked statues could be kitted out with well-placed fig leaves.
The citation for the award states that the book about "Reid's spiritual and intellectual journey gives a balanced in-depth critique of the man and his times, never fawning or censorious.
This mass murder and deception over two millennia is ultimately rooted in the Catholic Church's hostility to women and its censorious attitude about sex, which is why goddess worship (feminism) and orgies are the liberating routes to true spirituality.
McGruder became notorious during the heavily censorious aftermath of 9/11, when Boondocks" radical, elementary-school-aged hero, Huey Freeman, called the FBI's terrorism tip line to turn in "several Americans who have helped train and finance Osama Bin Laden .
When the women is drunk, her female colleagues are even more censorious than the men.
The announcement to drop Bud Pong came just two days after the censorious front-page article in Times had described college students playing beer pong, and using actual beer to do it.
Born in London, she's one of the few reporters who has consistently refused to be intimidated in Iraq by the censorious hand of Shrub and his minions.
Douglas was not censorious, and, as an admirer of Verlaine, night life amused him; Harold Acton, who thinks that Douglas looked like a Bishop in mufti, remembers how on nocturnal outings, he would recount tales about this poet and others about Wilde.
The volume lacks an index or detailed table of contents, making what might have been a handy encyclopaedia of Bush blunders into a grab-bag of censorious factoids.