censor

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censor

 [sen´ser]
a term used by Freud to refer to the mental faculty that guards the border between the unconscious and preconscious, preventing unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams. In Freud's later theory, the actions of the censor (displacement, condensation, symbolism, and repression) are considered defense mechanisms of the ego and superego.

cen·sor

(sen'sōr),
In psychoanalytic theory, the psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness unless they are so cloaked or disguised as to be unrecognizable.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]

censor

/cen·sor/ (sen´ser) the mental faculty that prevents unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams.

censor

(sĕn′sər)
n.
Psychology The agent in the unconscious that is responsible for censorship.
tr.v. cen·sored, cen·soring, cen·sors
To examine and expurgate.

cen′sor·a·ble adj.
cen·so′ri·al (sĕn-sôr′ē-əl) adj.

censor

Etymology: L, censere, to assess
1 a person who monitors or evaluates books, newspapers, plays, works of art, speech, or other means of expression in order to suppress certain kinds of information.
2 (in psychoanalysis) a psychic suppression that allows unconscious thoughts to rise to consciousness only if they are heavily disguised.

cen·sor

(sen'sŏr)
psychoanalytic theory The psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]

censor

A Freudian idea for the supposed agency that distorts or symbolizes repressed unpleasant material in the unconscious so that it need not be directly recognized either in dreams or in waking awareness. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.

censor

a member of a committee on ethics or for critical examination of a medical or other society.
References in periodicals archive ?
And because the censorial narrator is precisely this type of presence, we must complicate that conception of the narrator before we can understand the function of the censor.
But whatever the intent of the resolution, its effect was to awaken from a two-decade slumber the censorial shears of Lloyd Binford, who cared little for the intent or even the mandates of laws and ordinances.
However, it is also true that the changes in the editions of 1590 and subsequently 1596 (which the 1599 edition largely echoes) with regard to the first editions (Leiden, 1589, in 4[degrees] and in 8[degrees]) were mostly (though not totally) imposed by external, censorial pressure.
Movie ratings are not without censorial effects--producers negotiate with the ratings board and make cuts in order to achieve a desired classification but there is no question that American cinema today is far freer than in the heyday of the Code, when Joe Breen's blue pencil and the Legion of Decency's boycott threats combined to assure that films adhered to church doctrine.
On-camera commentators should have included more surviving thesps and voices among Marins' erstwhile censorial foes.
Such exercises inevitably and directly elicit the kind of proto-fascist, censorial impulses criticized in "Bum Rap.
They will not unleash or otherwise validate a censorial power that is at war with the First Amendment.
The actions of the censorial Hollywood Production Code in the 1930s, for example, are discussed only casually, as if the control over film content had little impact on the resulting product--a conclusion completely at odds with recent studies by historians Gregory Black and Tom Doherty.
To confront the curse of modernity, Panichas said, there was "need of an unconditional conservatism, lean, ascetical, disciplined, prophetic, unswerving in its censorial task, strenuous in its mission, strong in its faith, faithful in its dogma, pure in its metaphysic.
With this, the need for 'verdeckendes Schreiben' diminished, although Baumeister shows how Die Aktion was still subject to censorial pressures during the Weimar Republic.
Luckily for men, women tend not to be quite so censorial in their appraisal of the opposite sex.
Ava is not personally offended; rather, she is put off by the executive's censorial and exclusionary construction of her sexuality.