censor

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censor

 [sen´ser]
a term used by Freud to refer to the mental faculty that guards the border between the unconscious and preconscious, preventing unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams. In Freud's later theory, the actions of the censor (displacement, condensation, symbolism, and repression) are considered defense mechanisms of the ego and superego.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cen·sor

(sen'sōr),
In psychoanalytic theory, the psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness unless they are so cloaked or disguised as to be unrecognizable.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

censor

(sĕn′sər)
n.
Psychology The agent in the unconscious that is responsible for censorship.
tr.v. cen·sored, cen·soring, cen·sors
To examine and expurgate.

cen′sor·a·ble adj.
cen·so′ri·al (sĕn-sôr′ē-əl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cen·sor

(sen'sŏr)
psychoanalytic theory The psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

censor

A Freudian idea for the supposed agency that distorts or symbolizes repressed unpleasant material in the unconscious so that it need not be directly recognized either in dreams or in waking awareness. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, an official who spurs private censorial mobs to attack a disfavored speaker might--in an appropriately brought lawsuit, contingent on the usual questions of standing and immunity--be subject to a court injunction or even damages, just as if she performed the attack herself.
It is not clear whether Prospero was aware of and/or consented to these and other censorial interventions, but it is clear that they produce what Tymoczko calls a "cognitive dissonance" ("Censorship" 36), i.e., a friction between resistance and collusion, which raises ethical questions.
At the same moment that Ravanipour was departing Iran for the United States, another prominent and beloved cartoonist/writer, Mana Neyestani, was facing problems of his own with Iran's censorial practices.
One of the best chapters is chapter 3, "Circulating Morals (1900-1915)" by Nicola Wilson, which deals with the extensive censorial influence of the British lending libraries.
The marker's tone was defensive and censorial, as if I had no right to hold the views that I had expressed.
The Court is obviously troubled by the censorial implications of the plaintiff's argument.
Arguing that "opinions are not the objects of legislation," Madison reminded his colleagues that in a republic, "the censorial power is in the people over the Government and not in the Government over the people."
SAJO (ed.), Censorial Sensitivities: Free Speech and Religion in a Fundamentalist World, Eleven, The Netherlands 2007, 233-272.
The information has emerged, and no force -- however censorial -- can undo what has been done.