censor

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censor

 [sen´ser]
a term used by Freud to refer to the mental faculty that guards the border between the unconscious and preconscious, preventing unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams. In Freud's later theory, the actions of the censor (displacement, condensation, symbolism, and repression) are considered defense mechanisms of the ego and superego.

cen·sor

(sen'sōr),
In psychoanalytic theory, the psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness unless they are so cloaked or disguised as to be unrecognizable.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]

censor

/cen·sor/ (sen´ser) the mental faculty that prevents unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming into consciousness unless disguised, as in dreams.

censor

(sĕn′sər)
n.
Psychology The agent in the unconscious that is responsible for censorship.
tr.v. cen·sored, cen·soring, cen·sors
To examine and expurgate.

cen′sor·a·ble adj.
cen·so′ri·al (sĕn-sôr′ē-əl) adj.

censor

Etymology: L, censere, to assess
1 a person who monitors or evaluates books, newspapers, plays, works of art, speech, or other means of expression in order to suppress certain kinds of information.
2 (in psychoanalysis) a psychic suppression that allows unconscious thoughts to rise to consciousness only if they are heavily disguised.

cen·sor

(sen'sŏr)
psychoanalytic theory The psychic barrier that prevents certain unconscious thoughts and wishes from coming to consciousness.
[L. a judge, critic, fr. censeo, to value, judge]

censor

A Freudian idea for the supposed agency that distorts or symbolizes repressed unpleasant material in the unconscious so that it need not be directly recognized either in dreams or in waking awareness. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.

censor

a member of a committee on ethics or for critical examination of a medical or other society.
References in periodicals archive ?
The decision was immediately implemented and although I always used to see Turkey as a democratic country governed by the rule of law, I was effectively and officially censored.
Michael Wood, College of Art secretary, said: "No student's work has been censored in any way.
If this is news to you, that's probably because the mass media self-censor important news and trends, according to Project Censored, which operates out of Sonoma State University in Rohnert Park, California, and tries to shine a spotlight on "news that didn't make the news.
IF David Steel censored facts, who else is doctoring them in the Parliament today?
Humanist authors have been honored by Project Censored before.
Meyer occasionally reminds us that, in a heteronormative world, homosexuality is always censored in advance.
Rowling, now holds the dubious distinction of being the most censored books in America.
Earth Island Journal covered eight of the Project Censored Awards Top 25 Censored Stories, including the year's Number One Censored Story, "Bolivia's Water War Victory," a 2,000-word dispatch from on-the-scene reporter Jim Shultz [Autumn 2000].
They censored an advertiser on the basis of that advertiser's political beliefs.
Indeed, Hughes claims she is being censored by the federal government.
All Things Censored by Mumia Abu Jamal with Noelle Hanrahan Seven Stories Press, May 2000, $29.
Conventional approaches for analysing censored data are computationally complicated and often difficult to explain to practitioners.