cellulose

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cellulose

 [sel´u-lōs]
a carbohydrate forming the skeleton of most plant structures and plant cells. It is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature and is the source of dietary fiber, preventing constipation by adding bulk to the stool. Good sources in the diet are vegetables, cereals, and fruits.
absorbable cellulose (oxidized cellulose) an absorbable oxidation product of cellulose, applied locally to stop bleeding.
cellulose sodium phosphate an insoluble, nonabsorbable cation exchange resin prepared from cellulose; it binds calcium and is used to prevent formation of calcium-containing kidney stones.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs),
A linear B1→4 glucan, composed of cellobiose residues, differing in this respect from starch, which is composed of maltose residues; it forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound; useful in providing bulk in the diet.
Synonym(s): cellulin
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

(sĕl′yə-lōs′, -lōz′)
n.
A polysaccharide, (C6H10O5)n, that is composed of glucose monomers and is the main constituent of the cell walls of plants. It is used in the manufacture of numerous products, including paper, textiles, pharmaceuticals, and insulation.

cel′lu·lo′sic (-lō′sĭk, -zĭk) adj.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
An indigestible carbohydrate found in plants.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]

cellulose

A complex polysaccharide forming the structural elements in plants and forming ‘roughage’ in many vegetable foodstuffs. Cellulose cannot be digested to simpler sugars and remains in the intestine.

cellulose

a type of unbranched polysaccharide carbohydrate composed of from one to four linked (3-GLUCOSE units which can be hydrolysed by the enzyme CELLULASE. Cellulose is the main constituent of plant cell walls and is the most common organic compound on earth. It has high tensile strength because of H-bonding and is fully permeable.

cel·lu·lose

(sel'yū-lōs)
A linear B1→4 glucan; forms the basis of vegetable and wood fiber and is the most abundant organic compound.
[L. cellula, cell, + -ose]
References in periodicals archive ?
The funny thing about Lovins is that between 1976 and 2004--despite the fact that the US still did not have a single commercial producer of cellulosic ethanol--he lost none of his enthusiasm.
Dr Graeme Sweeney, Shell Executive vice-president of future fuels and C[O.sub.2], said: "I am excited we are leading the pack in cellulosic ethanol production technology.
In May, DuPont announced a joint venture with Danisco to deliver low cost, sustainable cellulosic ethanol technology.
It is the later of the three could help manufacturers of cellulosic ethanol sell their product to weary governments.
The plant providing the fuel is located one mile south of Upton, Wyo., and is the first commercially operational cellulosic ethanol facility in the United States.
"Biotech enzymes have been the key to enabling the use of renewable cellulosic biomass in the production of ethanol," the statement continues.
This publicity could be the start of something big, though a lot of people were scratching their heads the day after the speech, saying "what is cellulosic ethanol?" and "what the heck is switchgrass?" I'm just glad that Bush mentioned wood chips, because that could be very good news for the North American pulp and paper industry.
Branson said he believed that cellulosic ethanol would replace conventional fuel over the next 20 or 30 years.
accumulation of agricultural detritus such as corn husks, switchgrass, and wood chips--collectively known as cellulosic biomass--measures nearly a billion tons per year.
" Bringing Biofuels to the Pump," from the National Resources Defense Council, recommends that the United States invest $1 billion over the next 10 years in bioethanol commercialization to "drive the development of the first billion gallons of bioethanol capacity at a price approaching that of gasoline and diesel." The Biotechnology Industry Organization supports that recommendation and agrees with the NRDC that development of cellulosic biofuel is economically and strategically vital to helping end America's dependence on imported oil.
The main thrust of the story was that cellulosic ethanol is a workable technology that can compete with fossil fuels now, not sometime in the future.
Deco-Spex is also non-hygroscopic, unlike other cellulosic granite pigments.