polarity

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polarity

 [po-lar´ĭ-te]
the condition of having poles or of exhibiting opposite effects at the two extremities.

po·lar·i·ty

(pō-lar'i-tē),
1. The property of having two opposite poles, as that possessed by a magnet.
2. The possession of opposite properties or characteristics.
3. The direction or orientation of positivity relative to negativity.
4. The direction along a polynucleotide chain, or any biopolymer or macrostructure (for example, microtubules).
5. With respect to solvents, ionizing power.
6. The tendency of an organism to develop differentially along an axis.
[Mod. L. polaris, polar]

polarity therapy

Fringe medicine
A system of healthcare developed in the 1920s by an Austrian-American holistic doctor, Randolph Stone, who was a chiropractor, osteopath and naturopath. Stone’s system is based on the belief that the life forces controlling a person’s physical and emotional well-being can be blocked by poor habits and diet; good health depends on restoring a balance, or polarity, of the life forces, by promoting the body’s natural self-healing capabilities.

Each body region is said to have positive (+),negative (-) or null (0) energy. Polarity therapy involves five basic elements (ether, air, fire, water and earth) that affect five distinct energy centres. Four techniques are used to restore polarity: therapeutic touch or bodywork, enhancing awareness, diet (liver flush drink, “live foods”, i.e., fruits and vegetables) and stretching exercises. 

Polarity therapy energy centres 
• Air centre—Cardiorespiratory system.
• Earth centre—Rectum and bladder, which eliminate solids and liquids.
• Ether centre—Voice, ears, throat.
• Fire centre—Eyes, GI tract, gallbladder, liver, pancreas, spleen, sympathetic nervous system.
• Water centre—Pelvic and endocrine secretions, which control generative and emotional forces.

po·lar·i·ty

(pō-lar'i-tē)
1. The property of having two opposite poles, as that possessed by a magnet.
2. The possession of opposite properties or characteristics.
3. The direction or orientation of positivity relative to negativity.
4. The direction along a polynucleotide chain, or any biopolymer, or macro structure (e.g., microtubules).
[Mod. L. polaris, polar]

polarity

the morphological and/or physiological difference between the two ends of an axis, such as root and stem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoekstra, "Membrane dynamics and the regulation of epithelial cell polarity," International Review of Cytology, vol.
Stanier, "Epithelial cell polarity genes are required for neural tube closure," American Journal of Medical Genetics--Seminars in Medical Genetics, vol.
Planar cell polarity signaling, from fly development to human disease.
To overcome this problem, prothallus protoplasts may be used as an alternate experimental system for studying processes related to development of cell polarity. A protocol has been developed that consistently yields viable protoplasts that are capable of regeneration, development into fertile gametophytes, and production of sporophytes.
Arias, MD, of the Unit of Cell Polarity at Tufts University School of Medicine, stated: "Polarization of hepatocytes critical for hepatocyte production of bile.
Primary cilia play a central role in cystic disease pathogenesis, and multiple organ involvement is attributed to the primary cilia because they constitute the connection between mechanical sensing and osmotic and visual stimuli, while they manage to control the cell-cycle and epithelial cell polarity via cell signaling processes.
Reorientation of microtubules from transverse to longitudinal is a prerequisite for the establishment of a new (radial) cell polarity resulting in a lateral transport of auxin.
They have determined that Eyal, a protein phosphatase, controls cell polarity, cell fate and self-renewal in the mouse embryonic lung epithelial stem cells.
(31-34) My research clearly shows that nature's plan of commensal microbiotica absolutely cannot tolerate antiquorum tactics that include antimicrobial pharmaceuticals, natural anti-infectives, synthetic vitamins and chemicals, or the indiscriminate use of inorganic minerals that zap cell polarity and jam up the extracellular matrix and lymphatics.
It has been hypothesized that the highly aggressive behavior of micropapillary carcinoma may be attributed to a reverse in cell polarity in tumor nests where the stroma-facing (basal) surface of the cells acquires apical secretory properties.