pole

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pole

 [pōl]
1. either extremity of any axis, as of the fetal ellipse or a body organ.
2. either one of two points that have opposite physical qualities (electric or other). adj., adj po´lar.
cephalic pole the end of the fetal ellipse at which the head of the fetus is situated.
frontal pole the most prominent part of the anterior end of each cerebral hemisphere.
occipital pole the posterior end of the occipital lobe of the brain.
pelvic pole the end of the fetal ellipse at which the breech of the fetus is situated.
temporal pole the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe of the brain.

pole

(pōl), [TA]
1. One of two points at the extremities of the axis of any organ or body.
2. Either of two points on a sphere at the greatest distance from its equator.
3. One of two points in a magnet or an electric battery or cell having extremes of opposite properties; the negative pole is a cathode, the positive pole an anode.
4. Either end of a spindle.
5. Either of the differentiated zones at opposite ends of an axis in a cell, organ, or organism.
Synonym(s): polus [TA]
[L. polus, the end of an axis, pole, fr. G. polos]

pole

(pōl)
1. either extremity of any axis, as of the fetal ellipse or a body organ.
2. either one of two points which have opposite physical qualities.po´lar

animal pole 
1. the site of an oocyte to which the nucleus is approximated, and from which the polar bodies pinch off.
2. in nonmammalian species, the pole of an egg less heavily laden with yolk than the vegetal pole and exhibiting faster cell division.
cephalic pole  the end of the fetal ellipse at which the head of the fetus is situated.
frontal pole of cerebral hemisphere  the most prominent part of the anterior end of each hemisphere.
germinal pole  animal p.
occipital pole of cerebral hemisphere  the posterior end of the occipital lobe.
pelvic pole  the end of the fetal ellipse at which the breech of the fetus is situated.
temporal pole of cerebral hemisphere  the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe.
vegetal pole  that pole of an oocyte at which the greater amount of food yolk is deposited.

pole

(pōl)
n.
Biology
1. Either extremity of the main axis of a nucleus, cell, or organism.
2. Either end of the spindle formed in a cell during mitosis.
3. The point on a nerve cell where a process originates.

pole

Etymology: L, polus
1 (in biology) an end of an imaginary axis drawn through the symmetrically arranged parts of a cell, organ, ovum, or nucleus.
2 one of a pair of opposite forces or attractants, as in magnetism or electricity.
3 (in anatomy) the point on a nerve cell at which a dendrite originates. polar, adj.

pole

(pōl) [TA]
1. One of the two points at the extremities of the axis of any organ or body.
2. Either of the two points on a sphere at the greatest distance from the equator.
3. One of the two points in a magnet or an electric battery or cell having extremes of opposite properties; the negative pole is a cathode, the positive pole an anode.
4. Either end of a spindle.
5. Either of the differentiated zones at opposite ends of an axis in a cell, organ, or organism.
Synonym(s): polus [TA] .
[L. polus, the end of an axis, pole, fr. G. polos]

pole

1. either extremity of any axis, as of a body organ.
2. either one of two points that have opposite physical qualities (electric or other).

control pole
a pole with a loop at one end for capturing wild or dangerous small animals. The loop is put over the animal's head and pulled tight. Good poles have a nonslip device so that the animal cannot slip free because of relaxation on the cord by the operator.
frontal pole
the most prominent part of the anterior end of each hemisphere of the brain.
occipital pole
the posterior end of the occipital lobe of the brain.
temporal pole
the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe of the human brain.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, the celestial pole in Warring States and Han times was far from the Dipper.
2011, Coherence between geophysical excitations and celestial pole offsets.
Celestial pole offsets (CPO) are the differences between the observed pole position in space and its adopted model (IAU 2000 for nutation and IAU 2006 for precession).
Today the Wagon seems to precede the Dragon around the celestial pole as the sky turns, but during the 3rd millennium BC the north celestial pole was near Alpha Draconis (Thuban), so the Wagon and most of the Dragon pivoted closely around the pole opposite each other.
We have used the celestial pole offsets (CPO) from the recent IVS combined solution (Schluter and Behrend, 2007) ivs09q3X, covering the interval 1984.
Polaris lies very close to the north celestial pole, marking the point about which all the stars in the northern sky appear to revolve as the Earth rotates.
The results it yielded were inaccurate--it put the telescope degrees away from the celestial pole.
Five EOP, describing the full orientation of the Earth in space, were solved for: two components of polar motion (fixing the position of the spin axis in the body), the angle of proper rotation around the spin axis, and two components of the celestial pole offsets (describing the misalignment of the spin axis with its position in space predicted by an accepted precession-nutation model).
Even more exciting, Capella was only 1[degrees] from the north celestial pole, and Aldebaran was about 1[degrees] from Capella.
p], of the pole with respect to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF), the Earth Rotation Angle (ERA) that is given as a linear function of Universal Time (UT1) and two components of the celestial pole offset, dX, dY, which denote the observed corrections to the adopted precession-nutation model.
Against a uniformly black background, points of light in fixed relationship to one another slowly orbit the celestial pole or rise and set with clockwork regularity.
The star chart above can be used for checking the limiting magnitude around the South celestial pole with the naked eye.