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pole

 [pōl]
1. either extremity of any axis, as of the fetal ellipse or a body organ.
2. either one of two points that have opposite physical qualities (electric or other). adj., adj po´lar.
cephalic pole the end of the fetal ellipse at which the head of the fetus is situated.
frontal pole the most prominent part of the anterior end of each cerebral hemisphere.
occipital pole the posterior end of the occipital lobe of the brain.
pelvic pole the end of the fetal ellipse at which the breech of the fetus is situated.
temporal pole the prominent anterior end of the temporal lobe of the brain.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pole

(pōl), [TA]
1. One of two points at the extremities of the axis of any organ or body.
2. Either of two points on a sphere at the greatest distance from its equator.
3. One of two points in a magnet or an electric battery or cell having extremes of opposite properties; the negative pole is a cathode, the positive pole an anode.
4. Either end of a spindle.
5. Either of the differentiated zones at opposite ends of an axis in a cell, organ, or organism.
Synonym(s): polus [TA]
[L. polus, the end of an axis, pole, fr. G. polos]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pole

(pōl)
n.
Biology
1. Either extremity of the main axis of a nucleus, cell, or organism.
2. Either end of the spindle formed in a cell during mitosis.
3. The point on a nerve cell where a process originates.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

pole

(pōl) [TA]
1. One of the two points at the extremities of the axis of any organ or body.
2. Either of the two points on a sphere at the greatest distance from the equator.
3. One of the two points in a magnet or an electric battery or cell having extremes of opposite properties; the negative pole is a cathode, the positive pole an anode.
4. Either end of a spindle.
5. Either of the differentiated zones at opposite ends of an axis in a cell, organ, or organism.
Synonym(s): polus [TA] .
[L. polus, the end of an axis, pole, fr. G. polos]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
We confirm again that its inclusion yields better fit to the observed celestial pole offsets also with the new ESMGFZ geophysical excitations.
The earliest references to a polar asterism generally use the term dou [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "ladle/dipper" or chen [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] as here, rather than beiji [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "northern culmen." In contrast to ji [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], which clearly refers to the apex of the heavens, specifically the north celestial pole, bei chen usually refers to bei dou [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], the northern dipper, the asterism of primary importance closest to the pole (see n.
Right: The author's spreadsheet calculates the amount of altitude and azimuth adjustment of the mount's polar axis needed to align it with the celestial pole. Detailed instructions for using the spreadsheet are included when the free spreadsheet is downloaded.
Residuals change in trend Errors [years] [years] [mas] [mas] [mas/a] [mas/a] 0.0 - 3.1 0.0; 0.1 +66 66 0 - 3.1 - 10.6 0.1; 0.4 +30 20 +11 1 10.6 - 16.0 0.4; 0.0 +12 12 0 - 16.0 - 22.0 0.0; 0.5 -26 6 0 - 22.0 - 30.0 0.5; 0.0 +6 6 -2 3 Table 5 Data jumps and changes in trend of the model of celestial pole offset.
Adjusting the position of a computerized mount and having software report that your alignment is within a few arcseconds of the celestial pole may be very satisfying, but it's likely true only for the current conditions.
Prior to comparison, the observed data were smoothed to contain only the periods longer than 10 days, and long-periodic part of the observed polar motion and celestial pole offsets (for periods longer than 16 years) was removed.
The FCN contribution to the celestial pole motion at the given epoch was computed by using Eq.
You first need to aim the mount's polar axis to within at least a few degrees of the celestial pole to be sure Polaris is in the PoleMaster's field.
We use two different kinds of input data (celestial pole offsets and geophysical excitations) in our study, all covering the period 1989.0-2013.5:
Polaris lies very close to the north celestial pole, marking the point about which all the stars in the northern sky appear to revolve as the Earth rotates.
Over the next 11 months, during 110 observing sessions of 8 hours each and another 16 dusk-to-dawn marathons, and despite suffering headaches, rheumatism, and fevers, Lacaille mapped 9,766 stars to 1 as faint as 8th magnitude between the Tropic of Capricorn (declination -23.4[degrees]) and the south celestial pole. It was an astonishing feat of personal industry and endurance.
The EOP are two coordinates of the intermediate pole with respect to the ITRS, [x.sub.P], [y.sub.P], and the angle, which characterizes irregularity of the Earth's proper rotation, ERA, and finally, two components of the celestial pole offset, dX, dY, which denote the observed corrections to the adopted precession-nutation model (Capitaine at al., 2003 and Mathews et al., 2002).