pes cavus

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pes

 [pes] (pl. pe´des) (L.)
1. foot.
2. any footlike part.
pes abduc´tus talipes valgus.
pes adduc´tus talipes varus.
pes ca´vus talipes cavus.
pes hippocam´pi a formation of two or three elevations on the ventricular surface of the hippocampus.
pes pla´nus (pes val´gus) flatfoot.
pes va´rus talipes varus.

tal·i·pes ca'v·us

an exaggeration of the normal arch of the foot.

pes cavus

High arch Orthopedics A foot with a high longitudinal–toe to heel–arch Etiology Neuromuscular diseases Clinical Changed muscle tone, pain, especially when stress is placed on the arch, significant disability

pes cavus

(pes kā'vŭs)
Condition characterized by increased height of the foot's medial longitudinal arch.
Synonym(s): clawfoot, claw foot.

pes

(pes, pez) (pe'dez) plural.pedes [L.]
The foot or a footlike structure.

pes abductus

Talipes valgus.

pes adductus

Talipes varus.
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PES ANSERINUS

pes anserinus

1. The network of branches of the facial nerve as it passes through the parotid gland
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PES ANSERINUS
2. The combined tendinous expansions of the sartorius, gracilis, and semitendinosus muscles at the medial border of the tibial tuberosity. See: illustration

pes cavus

Talipes arcuatus.

pes contortus

Talipes equinovarus.

pes equinovalgus

A condition in which the heel is elevated and turned laterally.

pes equinovarus

A condition in which the heel is turned inward and the foot is plantar flexed.

pes equinus

A deformity marked by walking without touching the heel to the ground. Synonym: talipes equinus

pes gigas

Macropodia.

pes hippocampi

The lower portion of the hippocampus major.

infraorbital pes

Terminal radiating branches of the infraorbital nerve after exit from the infraorbital canal.

pes planus

Flatfoot.

pes valgus

Talipes valgus.

pes varus

Talipes varus.

pes cavus

See CLAW FOOT.
References in periodicals archive ?
The incidence of stress fractures in cavus foot is believed to be secondary to the more rigid, reduced shock absorbency of this type of foot (Korpelainen et al., 2001; Lloyd et al., 1986).
The patient develops a pes cavus foot, characterized by foot drop and hammer toes.
A tight iliotibial band, varus alignment, or a high-arched cavus foot can contribute to IT band friction syndrome