Verga ventricle

(redirected from cavum vergae)

Ver·ga ven·tri·cle

(ver'gah),
an inconstant, horizontal, slitlike space between the posterior one third of the corpus callosum and the underlying commissura fornicis (commissura hippocampi; psalterium) resulting from failure of these two commissural plates to fuse completely during fetal development; like the cavity of the septum pellucidum, the space is not a true ventricle in the sense that it did not develop from the neural canal of the neural tube.

Verga ventricle

(vĕr′gă)
[Andrea Verga, It. neurologist, 1811–1895]
A cleftlike space between the corpus callosum and the body of the fornix of the brain.

Verga,

Andrea, Italian neurologist, 1811-1895.
cavum vergae - Synonym(s): Verga ventricle
Verga ventricle - an inconstant, horizontal, slitlike space between the posterior one-third of the corpus callosum and the underlying commissura fornicis resulting from failure of these two commissural plates to fuse completely during fetal development. Synonym(s): cavum psalterii; cavum vergae; sixth ventricle
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cavum septum pellucidum and cavum vergae are noted as a normal variant.
This severe anomaly is called as cavum vergae (10).
Approximately 10 days before admission and hospitalization, he started experiencing symptoms such as breakdown, deterioration, inability to sleep at night, attention deficit, use of foul language, and visual and auditory hallucination with fluctuation through the day Cavum vergae was detected in the MRI of the brain, and no sign of contrast matter uptake or arterial wall thickening.
The brain MRI was evaluated again, and cavum septum pellucidum (cavum vergae) was identified (Figure 1).
Manic and psychotic symptoms in this case can be associated with SLE, cavum vergae that is a structural brain anomaly, intrusive infection, and steroid use.
Cavum vergae, a structural midline brain anomaly determined in MRI, is known to be seen more frequently in psychotic disorders compared to the normal population (11,12,13).
In the regulation of mood, cavum vergae -which is a structural brain anomaly and having a close proximity to key anatomic regions- is thought to form a predisposition for emergence of manic symptoms.
Cavum septi pellucidi and cavum vergae in normal and developmentally delayed population.