thoracic cavity

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cavity

 [kav´ĭ-te]
1. a hollow or space, or a potential space, within the body or one of its organs; called also caverna and cavum.
2. the lesion produced by dental caries.
Cavities in the body. From Applegate, 2000.
abdominal cavity the cavity of the body between the diaphragm above and the pelvis below, containing the abdominal organs.
absorption c's cavities in developing compact bone due to osteoclastic erosion, usually occurring in the areas laid down first.
amniotic cavity the closed sac between the embryo and the amnion, containing the amniotic fluid.
cranial cavity the space enclosed by the bones of the cranium.
glenoid cavity a depression in the lateral angle of the scapula for articulation with the humerus.
marrow cavity (medullary cavity) the cavity that contains bone marrow in the diaphysis of a long bone; called also medullary canal.
nasal cavity the proximal portion of the passages of the respiratory system, extending from the nares to the pharynx; it is divided into left and right halves by the nasal septum and is separated from the oral cavity by the hard palate.
oral cavity the cavity of the mouth, bounded by the jaw bones and associated structures (muscles and mucosa).
pelvic cavity the space within the walls of the pelvis.
pericardial cavity the potential space between the epicardium and the parietal layer of the serous pericardium.
peritoneal cavity the potential space between the parietal and the visceral peritoneum.
pleural cavity the potential space between the two layers of pleura.
pulp cavity the pulp-filled central chamber in the crown of a tooth.
cavity of septum pellucidum the median cleft between the two laminae of the septum pellucidum. Called also pseudocele, pseudocoele, and fifth ventricle.
serous cavity a coelomic cavity, like that enclosed by the pericardium, peritoneum, or pleura, not communicating with the outside of the body and lined with a serous membrane, i.e., one which secretes a serous fluid.
tension cavity cavities of the lung in which the air pressure is greater than that of the atmosphere.
thoracic cavity the portion of the ventral body cavity situated between the neck and the diaphragm; it contains the pleural cavity.
tympanic cavity the major portion of the middle ear, consisting of a narrow air-filled cavity in the temporal bone that contains the auditory ossicles and communicates with the mastoid air cells and the mastoid antrum by means of the aditus and the nasopharynx by means of the auditory tube. The middle ear and the tympanic cavity were formerly regarded as being synonymous.
uterine cavity the flattened space within the uterus communicating proximally on either side with the fallopian tubes and below with the vagina.

tho·rac·ic cav·i·ty

[TA]
the space within the thoracic walls, bounded below by the diaphragm and above by the base of the neck or superior thoracic aperture.

thoracic cavity

Etymology: Gk, thorax, chest; L, cavum
the cavity enclosed by the ribs, the thoracic part of the vertebral column, the sternum, the diaphragm, and associated muscles.
enlarge picture
Thoracic cavity

tho·rac·ic cav·i·ty

(thōr-as'ik kav'i-tē) [TA]
The space within the thoracic walls, bounded below by the diaphragm and above by the neck.
Enlarge picture
THORACIC CAVITY

thoracic cavity

The part of the ventral cavity above the diaphragm, the domed muscle that separates it from the abdominal cavity; it is enclosed by the chest wall. The thoracic viscera include the pleural membranes that surround the lungs, the mediastinum between the lungs, which contains the heart and pericardial membranes, the thoracic aorta, pulmonary artery and veins, vena cavae, thymus gland, lymph nodes, trachea, bronchi, esophagus, and thoracic duct. See: illustration
See also: cavity

thoracic cavity

the space within the THORAX.

cavity

1. a hollow or space, or a potentional space, within the body (e.g. abdominal cavity) or one of its organs (e.g. cranial cavity).
2. in teeth, the lesion produced by dental caries.

absorption c's
cavities in developing compact bone due to osteoclastic erosion, usually occurring in the areas laid down first.
amniotic cavity
the closed sac between the embryo and the amnion, containing the amniotic fluid.
cranial cavity
the space enclosed by the bones of the cranium.
dental cavity
1. the central space, often branched or multiple in compound teeth, of each tooth; carries the nerve and blood supplies to the teeth.
2. the defect caused by decay on a tooth surface. Called also caries.
glenoid cavity
a depression in the ventral angle of the scapula for articulation with the humerus.
infraglottic cavity
the space in the larynx caudal to the vocal folds; reflects the shape of the cricoid cartilage.
medullary (marrow) cavity
the cavity, containing marrow, in the diaphysis of a long bone; called also medullary canal.
nasal cavity
the proximal part of the respiratory tract, within the nose, bisected by the nasal septum and extending from the nares to the pharynx. Much of the cavity is occupied by the turbinate bones or conchae which also divide it into dorsal, medial and ventral meatuses. The common meatus is the narrow, vertical passage close to the nasal septum. The rostral end of the cavity just inside the nostril is the nasal vestibule, and the caudal part opening into the pharynx is the nasopharyngeal meatus.
oral cavity
the cavity of the mouth, made up of a vestibule and oral cavity proper.
pelvic cavity
the space within the walls of the pelvis.
pericardial cavity
the potential space between the epicardium and the parietal layer of the serous pericardium.
peritoneal cavity
the potential space between the parietal and the visceral peritoneum.
pleural cavity
the potential space between the parietal and the visceral pleura.
pulp cavity
the pulp-filled central chamber in a tooth; called also dental cavity.
serous cavity
a celomic cavity, like that enclosed by the pericardium, peritoneum or pleura, not communicating with the outside of the body and lined with a serous membrane, i.e. one which secretes a serous fluid.
tension cavity
cavities of the lung in which the air pressure is greater than that of the atmosphere.
thoracic cavity
the body cavity situated between the neck and the diaphragm.
tympanic cavity
the cavity of the middle ear.
uterine cavity
the space within the uterus communicating on either side with the uterine tubes and caudally with the vagina.

thoracic

pertaining to the chest. See also thoracolumbar.

thoracic asymmetry
if obviously distorted can mean that the flatter side has a collapsed lung. Not a helpful sign in cattle because of the normal asymmetry caused by the rumen.
thoracic breath sounds
breath sounds produced in the bronchi, bronchioles and alveoli by the passage of air; contrast with tracheal breath sounds.
thoracic cage
the bony structure enclosing the thorax, consisting of the ribs, vertebral column and sternum.
thoracic cavity
see thorax; called also chest.
thoracic duct ligation
a surgical procedure used in the treatment of chylothorax where medical management is unsuccessful.
thoracic girdle
the incomplete ring of bones that support the thoracic limb, made up of the scapula, clavicle, coracoid and occasionally other elements. Mammals have no coracoids (except in monotremes) and nongrasping animals have no clavicle so that the girdle consists only of the scapula. Grasping or climbing animals have a clavicle. Birds have a complete bony girdle. Called also pectoral girdle.
thoracic inlet
the entrance of the chest between the two first ribs, the manubrium, and the first thoracic vertebra.
thoracic limb
forelimb.
thoracic pain
such as that caused by broken ribs, torn intercostal muscles, pleurisy can cause a grunt at the end of each inspiration.
thoracic peristaltic sounds
can be of assistance in diagnosing diaphragmatic hernia in a dog or cat but they occur commonly in normal horses and cattle.
thoracic positioner
a sterilizable M-shaped metal trough which can be laid on an operating table and an animal propped up in it for surgery.
thoracic respiration
the diaphragm and abdominal muscles remain immobilized and play little part in respiration, as in peritonitis with diaphragmatic hernia.
thoracic segmental spinal cord degeneration
characteristic lesion in the inherited disease merino degenerative axonopathy.
thoracic surgery
surgical procedures involving entrance into the chest cavity. Until techniques for endotracheal anesthesia were perfected, this type of surgery was extremely dangerous because of the possibility of lung collapse. By administering anesthesia under pressure through an endotracheal tube it is now possible to keep one or both lungs expanded, even when they are subjected to atmospheric pressure.
thoracic symmetry
lack of symmetry between the two sides, viewed from above, can suggest lung collapse or a space-occupying lesion on the smaller side; in ruminants the presence of the rumen always enhances the size of the left side.
thoracic tube
see chest tube.
thoracic vertebrae
the vertebrae between the cervical and lumbar vertebrae, giving attachment to the ribs and forming part of the dorsal wall of the thorax.
thoracic wall
includes the ribs, sternum and thoracic vertebrae, the intercostal, superficial and deep, muscles, and the external respiratory muscles (transverse thoracic, rectus thoracic, serratus dorsalis and scalenus), and the costal pleura.
thoracic wall flap
a surgical approach to the thoracic cavity that combines an intercostal incision and sternotomy. It allows great exposure to structures of the cranial mediastinum and caudal cervical region.
thoracic wall wound
penetration through to the pleural cavity results in pneumothorax and collapse of the lung on that side.