cavernous sinus thrombosis


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cavernous sinus thrombosis

A serious condition caused by the backward spread of infection from the veins of the face or eye socket into an important venous channel, the cavernous sinus, within the skull. Intensive antibiotic treatment is necessary to save life.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is important to know this because cavernous sinus thrombosis affects three very important cranial nerves.
(iii) Urgent MR venogram (MRV)/CTV are required to confirm the diagnosis and exclude both sinoorbital infection and potentially fatal cavernous sinus thrombosis. (iv) Management options for this medical emergency include antibiotics, steroids, and/or anticoagulation.
4 patients with cavernous sinus thrombosis, 2 patients with Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, 3 patients with TB meningitis and 1 patient with Lepra reaction had abnormal CT findings.
Tributary venosinus occlusion and septic cavernous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings.
Venous thrombosis secondary to orbital infection is common and cavernous sinus thrombosis should be suspected in case with neurological deficit or rapidly increasing proptosis.
A CT angiogram revealed the compromised left cavernous sinus and cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery and, subsequently, cavernous sinus thrombosis, confirmed clinically and on imaging.
[1], [2] Orbital complications of sinusitis include edema, orbital cellulitis, subperiosteal abscess, orbital abscess, cavernous sinus thrombosis and in advanced stage intracranial complications such as meningitis and brain abscess.
Spread of untreated infection from the abscess can lead to a number of dangerous complications, including orbital cellulitis, meningitis, subarachnoid empyema, intracranial abscess, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and sepsis.
There was initially cavernous sinus thrombosis (Which is known to spread bilaterally via intercavernous veins).
Sphenoid sinusitis can lead to complications such as orbital cellulitis and abscess, orbital complex syndrome, blindness, sepsis, meningitis, epidural and subdural abscess, cerebral infarction, pituitary abscess, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and internal carotid artery thromosis.
Preseptal cellulitis, orbital cellulitis, subperiosteal abscess, orbital abscess and cavernous sinus thrombosis. [2]
Complications include hemorrhage, septal perforation, saddle nose deformity and, more rarely, cavernous sinus thrombosis and periorbital emphysema.