cavernous sinus thrombosis


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cavernous sinus thrombosis

a syndrome, usually secondary to infections near the eye or nose, characterized by orbital edema, venous congestion of the eye, and palsy of the nerves supplying the extraocular muscles. The infection may spread to involve the cerebrospinal fluid and meninges. Treatment involves antibiotics and sometimes anticoagulants.
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Cavernous sinus thrombosis

cavernous sinus thrombosis

A serious condition caused by the backward spread of infection from the veins of the face or eye socket into an important venous channel, the cavernous sinus, within the skull. Intensive antibiotic treatment is necessary to save life.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coexisting intracranial complications (N = 7) Epidural abscess 2 Otitic hydrocephalus 2 Meningitis 1 Cavernous sinus thrombosis 1
1], [2] Orbital complications of sinusitis include edema, orbital cellulitis, subperiosteal abscess, orbital abscess, cavernous sinus thrombosis and in advanced stage intracranial complications such as meningitis and brain abscess.
A CT angiogram revealed the compromised left cavernous sinus and cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery and, subsequently, cavernous sinus thrombosis, confirmed clinically and on imaging.
There was initially cavernous sinus thrombosis (Which is known to spread bilaterally via intercavernous veins).
Spread of untreated infection from the abscess can lead to a number of dangerous complications, including orbital cellulitis, meningitis, subarachnoid empyema, intracranial abscess, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and sepsis.
Preseptal cellulitis, orbital cellulitis, subperiosteal abscess, orbital abscess and cavernous sinus thrombosis.
Sphenoid sinusitis can lead to complications such as orbital cellulitis and abscess, orbital complex syndrome, blindness, sepsis, meningitis, epidural and subdural abscess, cerebral infarction, pituitary abscess, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and internal carotid artery thromosis.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can demonstrate soft tissue lesions better, especially in diagnosis of cavernous sinus thrombosis.
Complications include hemorrhage, septal perforation, saddle nose deformity and, more rarely, cavernous sinus thrombosis and periorbital emphysema.