caveat

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caveat

noun A warning.
verb To warn or place a disclaimer on an event or thing.

CAVEAT

Cardiology A trial–Coronary Angioplasty Versus Excisional Atherectomy Trial–that compared PCTA vs. atherectomy outcomes for managing Pts with CAD. See Angioplasty, Atherectomy, BOAT, Coronary artery disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
The proprietors, Bessy Nkirote and Patricia Kamathi, moved to court after a caveat was placed on their properties registered as Ruiru East/Juja East Block 2/18391, Block 2/18392 and Block 2/18393.
Most caveats are declared but even these pose challenges for commanders.
Germany and its caveats has been singled out by Washington for greatest attention, partly because this major member state of the alliance benefited so much from NATO solidarity in the cold war and partly because Berlin's caveats have restricted deployment of Bundeswehr troops to service only in the north of Afghanistan, which sees far less combat than areas along the Pakistan border.
And that brings us to caveat number one: A customer focus means just that.
Caveats: violence and sexual activity are explicit; the story is overpopulated with personal and romantic subplots not always easy to follow.
However, as in California, legislators in Washington will ask for some caveats to the new ruling: Illegal immigrants who are accepted to the University of Washington will have to prove they are in the process of gaining legal U.S.
While, in general, I think the authors provided adequate caveats to their conclusions, I think that a statement toward the end of the article was somewhat misleading.
Despite these caveats, Morse adds, the work "is suggestive" that organosilicon compounds are made by organisms.
Therefore, The Strange Death of American Liberalism reads like a long string of caveats, though a consistently interesting one.
However, we have some caveats regarding the comparison of these two studies.
With certain limitations and caveats, the message is--in order to continue to run strong as you age, you must train hard.
No firm wants the kind of publicity that Bear Stearns and Goldman Sachs got for putting their names on the fairness work on the Cendant debacle (see "The Cendant Deal: Limited Liabilities," page 46, and "The Tropical-Farah Deal: Assertions and Caveats in a Typical Fairness Opinion," page 48).