caveat


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caveat

noun A warning.
verb To warn or place a disclaimer on an event or thing.

CAVEAT

Cardiology A trial–Coronary Angioplasty Versus Excisional Atherectomy Trial–that compared PCTA vs. atherectomy outcomes for managing Pts with CAD. See Angioplasty, Atherectomy, BOAT, Coronary artery disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Afghanistan, for example, Operation Medusa (13) nearly failed when Canadian forces could not get the necessary support from other nations because of their national caveats related to combat operations.
2010 Cycle Report Revision: Subdivision (c) amended to clarify that a state agency filing a caveat need not designate an agent for service of process, and to provide that a caveator who is not a resident of the county where the caveat is filed must designate either a resident of that county or an attorney licensed and residing in Florida as the caveator's agent.
The Court concluded that the doctrine of caveat emptor did not apply where latent defects are actively concealed by the vendor.
Caveat: Individuals who decide not to put any of the money back because they now need to live on it as a result of Hurricane Katrina, will pay Federal income tax and possibly a 10% penalty when they file their 2005 income tax returns.
Editorial Note: CAVEAT is, it seems, a sophisticated 'debugger' designed for software operating in critical applications such as aircraft control systems, atomic reactors etc.
And I would argue that with an understanding of three basic principles and an adherence to three related caveats, its implementation need not be that difficult at all.
The biggest caveat concerns the Cold War, which, if you're willing to accept it as a war, as Brands does, then brings under the capacious umbrella of Brands's theory everything government took on domestically during the fifties, sixties, seventies, and eighties, from Medicare to environmental protection to the War on Poverty to wage and price controls.
One caveat: In people who weren't used to drinking tea, two cups raised blood pressure, probably because of the caffeine.
Of course, the important caveat for outdoor runners and cyclists is that music can distract you from more than just your level of exertion.
The caveat is, according to CMA's Rick Smith "that vinyls producers manage their business more prudently in the future than in the past."
If that is not true, then let traditional business principles apply, including caveat emptor.
* "It's incumbent upon us to take care of our own--with one caveat: We should not be expected to accept an inferior product or shoddy service because of that sentiment."