cautery


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Related to cautery: chemical cautery

cautery

 [kaw´ter-e]
1. a caustic substance or hot or cold instrument used in cauterization.
chemical cautery chemocautery.
cold cautery cryocautery.
electric cautery electrocautery (def. 2).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

cau·ter·y

(kaw'ter-ē),
1. An agent or device used for scarring, burning, or cutting the skin or other tissues by means of heat, cold, electric current, ultrasound, or caustic chemicals.
2. Use of a cautery.
[G. kautērion, a branding iron]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cautery

(kô′tə-rē)
n. pl. cauter·ies
1. An agent or instrument used to destroy abnormal tissue by burning, searing, or scarring, including caustic substances, electric currents, lasers, and very hot or very cold instruments.
2. The act or process of cauterizing.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

cau·tery

(kaw'tĕr-ē)
An agent or device used for scarring, burning, or cutting the skin or other tissues by means of heat, cold, electric current, or caustic chemicals.
[G. kautērion, a branding iron]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

cautery

A surgical instrument or agent used to burn, scar or destroy tissue. The electric cautery often consists of a short loop of wire, at the end of an insulated handle, which is made red hot by the passage of an electric current. The actual cautery is a metal rod heated in a flame.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Cautery

The use of heat, electricity, or chemicals to destroy tissue.
Mentioned in: Nosebleed
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cau·tery

(kaw'tĕr-ē)
Agent or device for scarring, burning, or cutting the skin or other tissues with heat, cold, electric current, ultrasound, or caustic chemicals.
[G. kautērion, a branding iron]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemical cautery has an advantage of being carried out in local anesthesia and children can tolerate chemical cautery well10.
On first postop day, there were 11 cases of mild pain in Group A who underwent unipolar cautery in comparison to Group B where we saw 18 cases of mild pain.
Conclusions: Cautery artifact may delay accurate staging at initial TURBT for large tumours by understaging up to 6% of patients.
Comparison of duration of cautery needed for hemostasis between perforated and nonperforated points is shown in Table 4.
A retrospective cohort study audited recurrence rates in 408 patients (mean age 41 years, range 5 months to 90 years) whose pyogenic granulomas were treated with either surgical excision or combinations of curettage, shave, and cautery. (1) Investigators identified cases of histopathologically confirmed pyogenic granuloma over a 10-year period from a hospital database.
We therefore decided to investigate the viability of localisation and cautery as a primary intervention for posterior epistaxis in the context of a South African training hospital.
No FloSeal patients were crossed over to cautery, but three patients in the cautery group were crossed over to FloSeal.
The uterine incision was made by unipolar cautery in 112 cases and by morcellation in 53 cases.
Objective: To compare monopolar cautery with cold steel dissection for tonsillectomy in pediatric age group.
Submucous diathermy: Intramucosal cautery is useful when attempting to induce involution of the mucosal glands within the submucosa without damaging the overlying ciliated mucosa.
* The ability to be coupled with an instrument holder--together known as the Cord Companion Duo[TM]--that adheres to any surface on the sterile field and is designed to maintain the stability of tools used in the OR, including cautery pencils and other heated instruments.